New Best Drug Rehabilitation Blog Post Looks at the Different Phases of Getting Drunk

Best Drug Rehabilitation, which offers treatment programs and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful, is focusing on the different phases of getting drunk in its latest blog post.

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People need to know that once they cross a certain line, it’s no longer merely having a few drinks; it’s abuse and addiction, which can dramatically turn their life upside down much quicker than they realize.

(PRWEB) April 23, 2014

Best Drug Rehabilitation, which offers treatment programs and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful, is focusing on the different phases of getting drunk in its latest blog post.

“In moderation and when consumed by those who’ve reached the legal age in their State or jurisdiction, there’s nothing wrong with alcohol and any calls for prohibition are simply unrealistic – it’s been around for thousands of years, and it’s here to stay,” commented Per Wickstrom, Best Drug Rehabilitation’s CEO and someone who battled addiction issues in his youth. “However, what’s severely lacking is a basic understanding of how the body reacts to alcohol. People need to know that once they cross a certain line, it’s no longer merely having a few drinks; it’s abuse and addiction, which can dramatically turn their life upside down much quicker than they realize.”

According to the Best Drug Rehabilitation blog post, there are four phases of getting drunk:

1. Euphoria, which generally occurs with BAC of 0.03 to 0.12 percent.
2. Excitement, which generally occurs with BAC of 0.09 to 0.25 percent.
3. Confusion, which generally occurs with BAC of 0.18 to 0.30 percent.
4. Stupor, which generally occurs with a BAC of 0.25 to 0.40 percent.

However, individuals who continue drinking past this fourth stage may fall into a coma, which generally occurs with BAC of 0.35 to 0.50 percent. And if their BAC exceeds .50 percent, they may lose their life.

Furthermore, while individuals rarely fall into a coma or die from alcohol (although it does happen), this doesn’t mean that they aren’t doing significant and eventually severe long-term damage to their health, which can result in:

•Liver damage including cirrhosis, hepatitis
•Incontinence due to kidney or bladder damage
•Cognitive problems arising from brain damage; poor memory
•Stomach pain due to ulcers
•Heart attack or stroke due to alcohol-induced high blood pressure
•Anemia due to depleted iron and vitamin B
•Decreased sperm production
•Fetal alcohol syndrome due to drinking during pregnancy
•Uncontrollable shakes, tremors
•Sudden weight loss due to stomach problems; loss of appetite; malnutrition
•Fatigue due to sleep disturbances; DT’s; hallucinations
•Chronic depression due to lost self-respect
•…and more

Added Per Wickstrom: “The good news is that recovering from alcohol abuse or adduction is not nearly as difficult as it was in the past. Today, individuals can find a qualified and certified treatment facility, and enrol themselves in an inpatient treatment program that provides with the around-the-clock medical care they need, along with a wealth of programs that help them identify the root causes of their alcoholism and build a better, stronger life ahead.”

The full text of Best Drug Rehabilitation’s latest blog entitled “What are the Different Phases of Getting Drunk on Alcohol” is available at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/blog/addiction/what-are-the-different-phases-of-getting-drunk-on-alcohol/.

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe(at)rehabadmin(dot)com.

About Best Drug Rehabilitation

Best Drug Rehabilitation offers treatment programs, and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful. Led by CEO Per Wickstrom, Best Drug Rehabilitation also understands that recovering from an addiction is an intense emotional and physical challenge, and as such provides clients with a comfortable and private space that is safe and free of anxiety. Ultimately, Best Drug Rehabilitation offers recovery geared to the personalized needs of each client, which is an option that makes the chance for long-term success much more likely.

Learn more at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/


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