Do Doctors Have It All Wrong? Scientific Journal Exposes Truth About Co-Q10

Journal reveals that there is no real evidence that CoQ10 supplementation does what doctors think it does. The article states that the problem lies in its lack of bioavailability.

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CoQ10 is the third most popular supplement in the U.S. Given its popularity, one would assume there's copious research to support these important health claims.

There is no evidence that orally supplemented CoQ10 ever makes it into other tissues beyond the bloodstream, let alone the mitochondria.

Incline Village, NV (PRWEB) June 20, 2014

Prescribed for a myriad of worrisome health conditions, Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation may not be the powerful cure-all that doctors believe it to be, according to a recent article in the Juvenon Health Journal (JHJ).

According to the JHJ, CoQ10 is the third most popular supplement in the United States. Over 6 million North Americans consume this supplement daily. CoQ10 is not only marketed as an antioxidant, but also as an anti-aging compound, a therapy for heart health and a prophylactic against the toxicity of statin drugs.

“Doctors are both recommending and prescribing CoQ10 for these and other conditions under the assumption that the supplement is beneficial to mitochondrial health,” the noted scientific journal states. “Given CoQ10’s popularity, one would assume there’s copious research to support these important health claims.”

Instead, the journal reveals that there is no real evidence that CoQ10 supplementation does what doctors think it does. The article first explains that CoQ10 is a critical biological compound, which plays a central role in cellular bioenergy regeneration and its regulation. It can be found in most cells of the body with the highest concentrations found in the cells of the heart, kidneys, liver and the most metabolically active and mitochondrially rich tissues.

“CoQ10’s mystique as a nutritional supplement surely stems from its presumed association with the mitochondria,” the article states.

The article explores a large array of CoQ10 clinical trials that “determined that there was no improvements in cardiac function, repair or mortality.”

According to the JHJ, the problem lies in bioavailability.

“Most CoQ10 supplements show bioavailability of less than 15 percent,” the article states. “Eighty-five percent or more of the supplement just passes through the gut unabsorbed. To date, there is no evidence that orally supplemented CoQ10 ever makes it into other tissues beyond the bloodstream, let alone the mitochondria.”

Later, the article offers alternative methods for cracking the mitochondrial barrier with supplements that can indeed be transported to the mitochondria.

“A vast body of research literature demonstrates that dietary lipoic acid and carnitine are rapidly absorbed and transported to tissues including passing the blood-brain-barrier,” the article reports.

For more information on CoQ10 and mitochondrial health, go to Juvenon Health Journal.


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  • Ann Lindemann

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