Hartz helps you and your pet celebrate the holidays safely

The holidays are fast approaching, which means savory food will be around the house for your dog or cat to potentially snack on. Hartz® is eager to help pet owners determine which holiday foods should and shouldn't be given to their animal companions

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Though these dangers can pose a serious threat to your pets’ health, a watchful eye and proper planning will pay off in the end so that your entire family, furry friends included, can enjoy the holidays together.

Secaucus,NJ (PRWEB) December 18, 2013

The holidays are fast approaching, which means savory food will be around the house for your dog or cat to potentially snack on. Hartz® is eager to help pet owners determine which holiday foods should and shouldn't be given to their animal companions. While it may be tempting to offer your pet a taste of that turkey, its digestive system probably will not be thanking you later. To make sure that you and your pet make it through this holiday season in good health, let Hartz guide you in what to share and what not to share with your cat or dog.

To meat or not to meat
Chances are, you'll be serving meat for at least one of your main holiday meals. Fatty foods, meats in particular, are a no-no for pets. Pancreatitis, an inflammatory disease of the pancreas, may develop as a result of excessive fat consumption. Turkey, ham and roasts all contain some fat, so be sure that these meats only enter the mouths of your guests. Raw and undercooked meat should also stay away from the feeding bowl, as they can contain harmful bacteria like E. coli and Salmonella. Hartz offers many meat-flavored products, so if you want your dog or cat to experience the holiday flavors, try one of these yummy treats instead.

Avoid onions and garlic
These two foods can be used in large quantities during your holiday cooking, but should be kept away from cats and dogs at all costs. Onions and garlic in any form can lead to red blood cell damage and anemia when ingested.

Skip dessert
And finally, the pies, cakes and other sweets covering your dinner table should not be offered to pets. Though you may be tempted to sneak a piece to your dog or cat, this is not advisable. Dogs and cats can experience serious illnesses from certain ingredients. Chocolate in particular will increase pets' heart rate, cause tremors and overly excite cats and dogs. Nuts are also risky, especially the macadamia variety. These nuts can lead to weakness, tremors, depression, and vomiting. Additionally, raisins and grapes provoke kidney failure mainly in dogs and possibly in cats. Uncooked dough should never be fed to dogs since it can expand inside the body, the effects of which can be deadly.

Though these dangers can pose a serious threat to your pets’ health, a watchful eye and proper planning will pay off in the end so that your entire family, furry friends included, can enjoy the holidays together.


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