Agein Corporation Responds to Stanford University Study and Warns Against Using Household Bleach as an Anti-Aging Skin Treatment

Agein.com, the Internet’s premier anti-aging web site focusing on anti-aging tips, news, and advice from some of the foremost experts in the industry, is responding to a recent study out of Stanford University and warning against using household bleach as an anti-aging skin treatment.

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Agein Corporation Responds to Stanford University Study and Warns Against Using Household Bleach as an Anti-Aging Skin Treatment

While these preliminary trials showed that a highly diluted bleach mixture reversed inflammation and aging of the skin, it’s important to remember that these are initial, early-stage trials, and not a license for people to apply bleach to their skin.

Boston, MA (PRWEB) December 02, 2013

Agein.com, the Internet’s premier anti-aging web site focusing on anti-aging tips, news, and advice from some of the foremost experts in the industry, is responding to a recent study out of Stanford University and warning against using household bleach as an anti-aging skin treatment.

According to recent research from Stanford University, household bleach can reduce inflammation and effectively treat skin damage caused by excessive sun exposure and radiation therapy. The research also claims bleach has potential as an anti-aging treatment. (Source: Leung, T.H., et al., "Topical hypochlorite ameliorates NF-κB–mediated skin diseases in mice," The Journal of Clinical Investigation web site, November 15, 2013; http://www.jci.org/articles/view/70895.)

Researchers gave mice a bath in a diluted bleach mixture (0.0005%). After two weeks, they discovered the skin on the mice bathed in the bleach solution appeared younger and experienced less severe skin damage, had better hair regrowth, and healed more quickly than those animals bathed only in water. The research team is considering testing the formula on humans.

"While these preliminary trials showed that a highly diluted bleach mixture reversed inflammation and aging of the skin, it’s important to remember that these are initial, early-stage trials, and not a license for people to apply bleach to their skin," says Dr. Kevin J. McLaughlin, Agein.com’s anti-aging specialist. "In fact, the changes were only visible through a microscope, and not noticeable to the naked eye."

According to Dr. McLaughlin, even though bleach is commonly found in grocery stores and drugstores, it poses a number of health risks. It's highly corrosive to the skin, lungs, and eyes, and can cause chemical burns and ulcerations. The oxidation of chlorine can also form hypochlorous acid, which can penetrate and destroy cell structure.

In fact, Dr. McLaughlin says that the burning sensation one feels when using bleach is a sign of the corrosive properties. The slippery feeling one gets when bleach comes into contact with the skin is a result of the lye reacting to the facts and oils in the body. "Bleach may be an effective kitchen or bathroom disinfectant, but it’s a very dangerous chemical that should not be used on the skin as an anti-aging treatment," he affirms.

Those looking for an anti-aging product should consider products that contain the most advanced, effective, and clinically proven ingredients available. Multiple studies have confirmed the anti-wrinkling benefits of Alpine rose extract. Matrixyl, a peptide, or protein fragment, has been shown to stimulate the production of collagen from within the skin, reduce the appearance of deep wrinkles, decrease wrinkle density, and improve skin tone. Argireline is a peptide that works specifically on expression wrinkles and has been shown to reduce the appearance of expression lines by 30%. (Sources: "PhytoCellTec Alp Rose Charges skin stem cell resistance," Mibelle Biochemistry Group web site; http://www.mibellebiochemistry.com/pdfs/Web_Brochure_PCT_Alp_Rose.pdf, last accessed November 29, 2013; "Matrikines and Rejuvenation," rbclife.info, http://www.rbclife.info/pdfs/c7/matrixyl3000.pdf, last accessed November 29, 2013; "Argireline," Botanical-Link.com, 2003; http://www.botanical-link.com/Argireline.pdf; Blanes-Mira, C., et al., "A synthetic hexapeptide (Argireline) with antiwrinkle activity," International Journal of Cosmetic Science, 2002.24, 303–310; http://www.biologicsolutions.com/content/179632/clinicalstudy.pdf; "The First Peptide for Expression Wrinkles," Nature’s Beauty Cosmetics web site; http://www.naturesbeautycosmetics.com/studies/argireline.pdf, last accessed November 29, 2013.)

About Agein.com:

The company’s goal is to inspire and coach readers to adapt an anti-aging lifestyle that suits their individual needs. Its anti-aging experts offer education on diet, fitness, and skin care and how all of these areas affect the way people look and feel. Agein.com also provides information on all of the latest advances in anti-aging research the hottest anti-aging trends in Hollywood, and beauty tips. Agein.com will equip readers with all of the tools they need to make the right anti-aging lifestyle choices. To learn more about Agein Corporation, visit the company’s web site at http://www.Agein.com.


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