Latest Blog Post From per Wickstrom Helps People Make Amends With Those Who They’ve Wronged as an Addict

Forgiving an addict who has left an immense – and perhaps incalculable – trail of destruction in their wake may be one of hardest things for family members and former friends to consider. However, those who are looking for ways to get rid of their anger, hurt and sadness should read the latest blog post from Per Wickstrom, which provides helpful tips on forgiving an addict.

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While it may be extremely hard – or perhaps for the moment, impossible – for some people to forgive a recovering or recovered addict, I’m hoping that these tips will help point them in that direction, and let the healing begin.

(PRWEB) February 12, 2014

Forgiving an addict who has left an immense – and perhaps incalculable – trail of destruction in their wake may be one of hardest things for family members and former friends to consider. However, those who are looking for ways to get rid of their anger, hurt and sadness should read the latest blog post from Per Wickstrom, which provides helpful tips on forgiving an addict.

“As someone who has personally struggled with addiction in my youth, I’ll be the very first to admit that many innocent bystanders – including family members, friends, colleagues and the list goes on – are often caught up in the whirlwind, and are part of the collateral damage count,” commented Per Wickstrom, who in addition to blogging on drug and alcohol abuse and recovery issues, also focuses on topics related to personal development, relationships, health, entrepreneurship, and several others. “And while it may be extremely hard – or perhaps for the moment, impossible – for some people to forgive a recovering or recovered addict, I’m hoping that these tips will help point them in that direction, and let the healing begin.”

Per Wickstom’s helpful tips on how to forgive an addict include:

  • Accept that forgiveness is a choice that can be made, not a requirement that must be fulfilled. Sometimes, simply knowing that one “can” do something vs. feeling that one “has” to do something can make a huge difference.
  • Grasp, as much as possible, that addiction is far more than “skin deep.” It’s an in-depth psychological, emotional and physical illness that renders addicts far more powerless than can be perceived from the outside.
  • Appreciate that understanding is achieved through honest communication, and that it’s only through dialogue that real forgiveness can take place.
  • Take into consideration that a relapse is a very real threat that many addicts live with – often for the rest of their lives. As such, forgiveness could be more than just about what happened in the past: it could help prevent more pain and suffering in the future, possibly involving people that the person doing the forgiving will never know or meet.
  • Even if forgiveness is not possible at this time, those who have been hurt will do themselves a tremendous service by accepting and acknowledging an apology. They don’t have to say “I forgive you” – but for their own benefit, they should say “I accept your apology.”
  • Many recovering and former addicts honestly don’t know how to apologize – the damage they’ve caused is too huge. As such, what may seem like a paltry gesture – such as an “I’m sorry” letter or some other act – may be nothing short of a breakthrough. Keep this in mind and don’t necessarily apply the same standards that would make sense in a different type of apology or reconciliation situation.

More information on these and other helpful tips, along with the full text of Per Wickstrom’s must-read blog post for anyone who has, is or might be caught up in the whirlwind of someone else’s addiction, are available at http://www.perwickstrom.com/advice/10-helpful-tips-to-forgiving-an-addict/.

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe(at)rehabadmin(dot)com.

About Per Wickstrom

Per Wickstrom is the President and Founder of Best Drug Rehabilitation, a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center focused on helping individuals through holistic and natural methods. Per believes that it's never too late to turn your life around and do something positive with your life - he is living proof that hard work, perseverance, and a positive attitude can overcome any negative situation.

Learn more at http://www.PerWickstrom.com.


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