Per Wickstrom’s Latest Blog Post Highlights 10 Illegal Interview Questions that Employers Should Avoid at all Costs

By their very nature, job interviews are stressful experiences and for most people, typically conjure up feelings of dread and doubt rather than excitement and enthusiasm. However, there’s a line between a tough question and an illegal one, and according to Per Wickstrom in his latest blog post, it’s a line that a number of employers are crossing each day.

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Finding the right talent is probably the biggest challenge there is – even more than getting financing or entering into a competitive market.

(PRWEB) May 07, 2014

By their very nature, job interviews are stressful experiences and for most people, typically conjure up feelings of dread and doubt rather than excitement and enthusiasm. However, there’s a line between a tough question and an illegal one, and according to Per Wickstrom in his latest blog post, it’s a line that a number of employers are crossing each day.

“Finding the right talent is probably the biggest challenge there is – even more than getting financing or entering into a competitive market,” commented Per Wickstrom, who blogs regularly at http://www.PerWickstrom.com on business, health, personal development and addiction recovery topics and issues. “And it’s a task that gets even more challenging when employers – knowingly or unknowingly – violate a prospective employee’s Civil Rights by asking illegal questions.”

According to Per Wickstrom, the 10 questions that employers cannot ask under any circumstances include:

1. Questions about age. Employers can, however, ask if prospective employees are under the workplace’s regular retirement age.

2. Questions about a criminal activity or record. Some positions, however, may require a criminal record check and prospective employees can be informed of this during the interview process.

3. Questions about disabilities. Employers can, however, ask about whether a prospective employee is physically capable and/or comfortable performing specific duties or tasks that the job will require (e.g. lifting boxes).

4. Questions about drugs, alcohol or smoking. Employers can develop policies to promote a drug-free workplace. However, they should develop these policies in conjunction with an attorney to ensure that they don’t run afoul of State or Federal anti-discrimination laws.

5. Questions about marital or parental status. Avoiding these questions can be particularly challenging, because questions about family often arise casually – and sometimes even before the interview itself begins.

6. Questions about national origin. Naturally, employers must verify that a potential employee can legally work in the US. Plus, it’s fine to ask what languages they speak and/or write. However, questions about ethnic origins, heritage, or cultural background are off limits and should be avoided.

7. Questions about race or color. Sometimes, a prospective employee may bring this issue up. If so, employers should politely yet quickly change the subject.

8. Questions about citizenship. Similar to #6, employers cannot ask when a prospective employee became a US citizen. However, it is fine to ask them to provide verification of their employment eligibility.

9. Questions about religion. Unless the job specifically requires that a prospective employee practice a particular religion (e.g. a youth pastor in a local Baptist church), then questions about religion are off limits.

10. Questions about where they live. Employers can reasonably ask whether a potential employee can arrive at work by a specific time. However, they cannot ask where they live.

The full text of Per Wickstrom’s latest blog post entitled “10 Interview Questions that are Actually Illegal” is available at http://www.perwickstrom.com/business/10-interview-questions-that-are-actually-illegal/

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe(at)rehabadmin(dot)com.

About Per Wickstrom

Per Wickstrom is the President and Founder of Best Drug Rehabilitation, a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center focused on helping individuals through holistic and natural methods. Per believes that it's never too late to turn your life around and do something positive with your life - he is living proof that hard work, perseverance, and a positive attitude can overcome any negative situation.


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