Editorial Look Book -- America's Flower Farmers and Floral Designers Reveal "Slow Holiday Decor" Tips and Techniques Using Local and Seasonal Botanicals

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Put a twist on the ubiquitous carved pumpkin, cornucopia filled with gourds, or potted poinsettias and take inspiration from America's flower farms, fields and meadows when you design for harvest, home and holiday, say members of Slowflowers.com.

Embellish novelty pumpkins and ornamental gourds with succulents and seashells.

Embellish novelty pumpkins and ornamental gourds with succulents and seashells for your harvest decor. Designed by Slowflowers.com member Kathleen Barber of Erika's Fresh Flowers in Warrenton, OR

Transform the holiday table, front porch or fireplace mantel with local and seasonal flowers. Nothing is fresher or more long-lasting than just-picked botanicals. -- Debra Prinzing, founder of Slowflowers.com

Instead of predictable designs or palettes of the past, creative flower farmers and florists suggest fresh and unique seasonal options such as adding hot peppers or ornamental kale to autumn centerpieces or "planting" pumpkins with succulents for harvest tables.

Come December, Slowflowers.com designers say "Season's Greetings" is best communicated with updated florals, including snowy white palettes or garlands of foraged greenery to welcome guests.

The best harvest, home and holiday florals begin with the source, says Debra Prinzing, founder and creative director of Slowflowers.com, which promotes American grown flowers.

"You can transform the holiday table, your front porch or your fireplace mantel with local and seasonal flowers, supplied by local farms or provided by florists who source domestic, American grown options. Nothing is fresher or more long-lasting than choosing just-picked botanicals. By making floral choices close to home, we're keeping our holidays more sustainable," Prinzing says.

Slowflowers.com, the free, nationwide, online directory to American Flowers, surveyed its members across the nation and collected some of the best design ideas for harvest, home and holiday.

Top decor themes for 2016 include:

  •     Pair seasonal edibles with flowers
  •     Adorn grapevine wreaths with botanicals
  •     Upgrade pumpkins and gourds beyond ordinary
  •     Elevate flowers with leaves, grains and berries
  •     Add a touch of glam with gold
  •     Change traditional winter floral palettes with fresh flowers

Editors: A gallery of 16 captioned Harvest & Holiday images is available for download here.

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Slow Flowers is an award-winning online directory created to help consumers find florists, studio designers, wedding and event planners, supermarket flower departments and flower farmers that supply American grown flowers. Founded in 2014, the site has grown to 700 members across the U.S.

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For more information, please contact Debra Prinzing at 206-769-8211 or 844-SLOWFLO (844-756-9356); debra(at)slowflowers.com.

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Debra Prinzing

Debra Prinzing
@dkprinzing
since: 04/2008
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Use touches of gold to add sparkle and surprise. Laurie Garza of Fleurie Flower Studio in Reedley, CA, designed a warm, cozy fall table with dahlias, zinnias, hops, sorghum and bunny tail grasses.Use touches of gold to add sparkle and surprise. Laurie Garza of Fleurie Flower Studio in Reedley, CA, designed a warm, cozy fall table with dahlias, zinnias, hops, sorghum and bunny tail grasses."The cabbages needed a little spark and added interest, so I used 24 karat gold spray paint to touch them up. It adds a surprise element to an otherwise organic setting," she says. (c) Ellie Koleen Photography with permissionCombine warm and cool floral colors for a surprising palette. Tobey Nelson of Vases Wild in Langley, WA, designs with a fresh mix of ingredients not typically associated with autumn.Combine warm and cool floral colors for a surprising palette. Tobey Nelson of Vases Wild in Langley, WA, designs with a fresh mix of ingredients not typically associated with autumn.All of the ingredients in the low, long centerpiece are from flower farms in Washington and California. Nelson says this shape is ideal for large gatherings. "The piece stays low enough for guests to see one another across the table."Add scarlet leaves and ornamental grains to convey autumn's rich palette. Hannah Morgan of Fortunate Orchard in Seattle, WA, tucked vibrant foliage from local maple, oak and liquidambar trees into seaAdd scarlet leaves and ornamental grains to convey autumn's rich palette. Hannah Morgan of Fortunate Orchard in Seattle, WA, tucked vibrant foliage from local maple, oak and liquidambar trees into seaField grains, like amaranth and millet, and miniature autumn vegetables speak to the celebratory mood of the harvest holidays. Fall blooms, ornamental grasses and sword fern round out this cornucopia of Pacific Northwest fall flora. (c) Fortunate OrchardEntertain holiday guests with a greeting that trims the front door. Christy Hulsey and Amanda Currier of Colonial House of Flowers in Statesboro, GA embellished the front door with a garland of localEntertain holiday guests with a greeting that trims the front door. Christy Hulsey and Amanda Currier of Colonial House of Flowers in Statesboro, GA embellished the front door with a garland of local"You can make your own fancy floral arrangement just from your backyard or your local grocery store," Hulsey says. The addition of a hand-lettered "ribbon" cut from Kraft paper personalizes each gathering. (c) Colonial House of Flowers Photography.