Swingle Tree Removal Technicians Find & Relocate 30,000-member Bee Colony in Denver

The Western honeybee is increasingly endangered and critical to Colorado’s ecosystem. Swingle tree removal technicians safely relocated a large hive.

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Tree Trimming Denver - Bee Colony Relocation - Swingle

The bee colony was embedded in the tree

The importance we place on protecting Colorado’s environment puts Swingle in the best possible position to quickly identify issues and promptly formulate and execute the proper plan of action.

Denver, Colorado (PRWEB) August 21, 2013

Tree removal technicians for Swingle Lawn, Tree and Landscape Care strengthened the Colorado ecosystem by relocating a 30,000-member Western honeybee colony while working in southwest Denver.

The decline of the Western honeybee is of increasing concern. “You can thank,” said Time Magazine in the cover story for its August 19, 2013 issue, “the Western honeybee for one in every three mouthfuls you’ll eat today.” The Bryan Walsh article focuses on the causes and current danger the world faces with a decreasing bee population and emphasizes the importance of bees to everyday living.

Because trees are natural nesting places for wildlife, when Swingle performs tree removal or tree pruning services, technicians sometimes find animals or insects living in the tree. In each case, decisions must be made regarding the tree and its inhabitants. Are they endangering or potentially endangering the tree and by immediate extension humans or property? Should the animals or insects be relocated, ignored or exterminated?

“The correct answers to those and other questions, which only occur to properly-trained professional technicians, vary depending on each situation,” said Swingle owner and CEO Tom Tolkacz. “Our ability to hire the very best in Colorado landscaping, our internal communications and training systems and the importance we place on protecting Colorado’s environment puts Swingle in the best possible position to quickly identify issues and opportunities and promptly formulate and execute the proper plan of action. It’s just one of the ways Swingle stays ahead of the pack.”

This was the case in late July, 2013, when Swingle crews were called to remove a rotted cottonwood tree as part of the Bowles Inlet Ditch Repair Project. During inspection, a Swingle crew member noticed a large, active hive. Knowing the importance of the Western honeybee to the Colorado ecosystem, he immediately reached out through Swingle’s extensive partner network to find a new home for the colony. Swingle client Pinehurst Country Club resident horticulturalist Bobbi Storrs arranged for the hive to be relocated to the Pinehurst grounds.
Because the hive could not be extricated from the tree without placing the colony in peril, Swingle cut a large part of the tree away from the rest, transported it to Pinehurst Country Club and placed it in what Ms. Storr determined the optimal place for the bees, the Club’s ecosystem, its members and surrounding community.

The bee colony was the second hive of a size of 30,000 or greater Swingle had worked to relocate within two weeks.

About Swingle Lawn, Tree & Landscape Care
Founded in Denver in 1947, Swingle Lawn, Tree and Landscape Care has grown to be the one of the largest residential and commercial lawn service and tree care companies in Colorado, employing more certified arborists than any other Colorado company. For information please contact Vince Serio VSerio (at) MySwingle.com (303) 337-6200 or visit MySwingle (dot) com/contact.