Woo Data Reveals Women in Tech Ask for 16% Less Salary Than Men

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Data Shows Women Are Equal Risk-Takers, Yet Consistently Underestimate Their Worth

Woo findings on Salary Gender Gap

“This data shows that, while women are looking to compete equally - and certainly aren’t asking for any special treatment - they may be short-changing themselves by underestimating their market worth,” said Woo CEO and co-founder, Liran Kotzer.

Today Woo (woo.io), the first platform that lets tech talent gauge their market value, revealed data that show women in tech may be inadvertently handicapping themselves by underestimating their market value. Woo platform data confirms, while women and men have an equal appetite for risk, women ask for 16% less salary than men for the same positions.

The data comes as the world recognizes International Women’s Day, with a plea to close the workplace gender gap. The World Economic Forum predicted in 2014 that it would take until 2095 to achieve global gender parity. Then one year later in 2015, they estimated that a slowdown in the already glacial pace of progress meant the gender gap wouldn't close entirely until 2133 - more than a century from now.

Woo’s authentic data, generated from thousands of U.S. tech workers registered on the Woo platform, shows that women in tech are asking for both less salary, and less flexibility, than men. Not only did women ask for an average salary of $108,000 compared to men’s $128,000, men were more likely to ask to work from home and to have flexible hours than women. Other highlights from Woo data on gender equality in the U.S. tech sector include:

●    Men and women are nearly equal risk-takers: 77.4% of women are ready to work in startups, vs. 82.3% of men.
●    More men are asking to work from home than women: 14% of women vs. 18.5% of men
●    More men are asking for flex hours than women: 10.2% of women, vs. 12.8% of men

“This data shows that, while women are looking to compete equally - and certainly aren’t asking for any special treatment - they may be short-changing themselves by underestimating their market worth,” said Woo CEO and co-founder, Liran Kotzer. “Companies need to provide equal opportunity, but - at the same time - women in tech need to understand and ask for the salary and benefits that they deserve.”

Woo’s platform matches tech worker expectations with companies that are agreeable to meeting a candidate’s “must-have” requirements. Tech talent, including software engineers, developers, product managers, QAs, DevOps and designers, remain anonymous during the process, and only share their full identity if they decide to pursue a job opportunity. As such, it is a “blind” interview process, where gender is a non-issue.

Woo is available on an invite-only basis currently to IT tech professionals. Interested parties can go to Woo’s website, http://woo.io/, and request an invite.

Woo Who?
Privately-held, Woo operates out of San Francisco and Tel Aviv. Its namesake platform, Woo, lets tech talent effortlessly learn their real demand and market value, while remaining fully anonymized. Unlike existing solutions, Woo focuses on helping tech talent know their true potential, regardless of whether they want to change their job or not. The company works with leading-edge tech brands, including Microsoft, Adobe, Yahoo!, WeWork and more. For more information, please visit http://www.woo.io.

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Press Contact:
Carmen Hughes
Ignite Public Relations
C: +1.650.576.6444
carmen(at)ignitepr(dot)com

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CARMEN HUGHES
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since: 01/2016
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