A Forever Recovery Releases New Information Countering Studies Claiming Benefits of Moderate Alcohol Consumption

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After recent analysis of data from past studies, the Society for the Study of Addiction has released a statement discounting results that suggest moderate alcohol consumption is beneficial to health. A Forever Recovery releases a new article countering these benefits.

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'We recommend that future estimates of the alcohol-related burden of disease and national drinking guidelines should no longer assume any protective effects from low dose consumption', says the authors of the Society for the Study of Addiction research.

It has long been a widely accepted notion that low to moderate consumption of alcohol has certain health benefits, such as protecting against cardiovascular disease or heart problems. However, the Society for the Study of Addiction (SSA) has newly released an editorial that discounts these results as inconclusive. In a recent blog post, A Forever Recovery discusses these new findings, reviewing the editorial published by the SSA as well as some of the studies that suggested alcohol might be healthy in low doses.

“We aren’t suggesting that every person who drinks alcohol has an addiction,” says A Forever Recovery founder and CEO Per Wickstrom. “However, with this new information coming to light, we hope that more people who are struggling with alcohol addiction will realize the damage that they are doing to their bodies and their lives, and seek the help and treatment that they need.”

Results of the Alcohol Study

The results published by the Society for the Study of Alcoholism detailed some of the problems that the previous studies had in their methods of observation. For example, the groups that were categorized as “abstainers” also included people who had previously been heavy drinkers but had quit drinking before participating in the study. The damage that had been done to their brains and bodies were not taken into account, which led the results to be slightly skewed against abstaining from alcohol and showed low to moderate drinking in a more favorable light. This is known as “selection bias”, which invalidates the results of the studies.

Other problems with the studies included the use of vague language, employing terms like “might” or “possibly” to describe health benefits of alcohol consumption, results which are hardly conclusive. Some studies also included results that were related to other factors, such as smoking or dietary elements.

“The foundations of the hypothesis for protective effects of low-dose alcohol have now been so undermined that, in our opinion, the field is due for a major repositioning of the status of moderate alcohol consumption as protective,” the authors of the Society for the Study of Addiction research concluded. “We recommend that future estimates of the alcohol-related burden of disease and national drinking guidelines should no longer assume any protective effects from low dose consumption. The hypothesis of health benefits from moderate drinking should no longer play a role in decision making.”

For more information on this topic call us or visit our site at http://www.aforeverrecovery.com.

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Pamela Anderson
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