HomeThangs.com Has Introduced A Guide To Planning An Age In Place Bathroom Remodel

Age in place bathroom design allows homeowners to remain independent in their own homes, providing accessibility to those with less mobility. HomeThangs.com has introduced a guide to when and to what extent accessibility features should be included in a bathroom remodel.

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Meditub 30 x 54 x 38 in. walk in tub 3054 series

Meditub 30 x 54 x 38 in. walk in tub 3054 series

The whole notion behind age in place design is to allow homeowners to grow old comfortably in their own homes, and having accessibility features in place before they're needed is an important first step.

(PRWEB) October 16, 2013

HomeThangs.com – the Online Home Improvement Store has made their goal to deliver the right product to the consumer. With that in mind, shopping and home design tips, as well as special product selections are being introduced.

Age in place design involves incorporating accessibility features into a large scale remodel. Typically, this is done before those features are needed by the homeowners, thus enabling them to age comfortably in their own home. HomeThangs.com has introduced a guide to some of the factors that determine when, whether, and to what extent age in place features should be a part of a prospective bathroom remodel.

Cost is actually a fairly minor factor in whether or not to include age in place features in a major bathroom remodel. ADA approved fixtures are typically very similar in price to their less accessible counterparts, both in terms of smaller purchases, like a toilet, and larger ones, like a whirlpool tub. While some features – like pull chain fall alarms – aren’t standard bathroom fare, by and large most age in place features offer a one-to-one swap.

That said, cost becomes an indirect factor relative to the age of the homeowners. Age is actually one of the top deciding factors, as it’s important to consider resources – both financial and physical – that are currently available that may not be after retirement or later in life. Slightly younger homeowners should also consider how many remodels they plan to do before retiring, as a longer timeline offers more leeway in when to install some age in place features. For those in good health but who will soon be living on a fixed income, installing accessibility features now can be well worth the investment.

The whole notion behind age in place design is to allow homeowners to grow old comfortably in their own homes, and having accessibility features in place before they're needed is an important first step. That said, long-term living plans should be at the forefront of any conversation about age in place remodeling. Incorporating universal design elements early is an extremely good idea, but only insofar as those features will be used, and won't negatively impact a home's resale value if the owners decide not to stay there.

Age in place features are also only really valuable for homeowners who intend to stay in their current home for as long as possible. Some features – like walk in tubs or plastic shower seats –won’t hold the same appeal for young buyers, and can be something of a drawback when the house is resold. That said, the basic tenants of universal design – like having easy to use faucets, slip resistant flooring, and luxury features that add functionality (like hand showers or thermostatic controls) – hold a more universal appeal, and are a safer choice in terms of potential resale value.

Finally, even if a full scale accessible remodel isn’t in the picture right now, it can be worth laying the groundwork for a more accessible bathroom early on. Adequate support for grab bars, textured tile, and large, open shower enclosures (with room for a caregiver and wheelchair or walker access). These smaller upgrades can pave the way for a more extensive accessibility overhaul in the future. Many accessible features also have a luxury appeal, which can keep an age in place bathroom from feeling hospital-like even if the features are installed long before they’re needed.

For more information about accessible bathrooms, check out the full article here.

HomeThangs.com is not only a home improvement superstore, it also provides expert design tips and a comprehensive shopping guide, taking the ideas from professional interior designers, and offering tips to the consumers on how to pick the products to best suit their needs.