Attorney Santiago A. Alpizar Esq. Examines Essentials of Entering the U.S. as a Refugee

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Florida immigration attorney Santiago A. Alpizar lists the top three tips for immigrants seeking refuge in the United States.

Santiago A. Alpizar Esq.

Never presume your case will be easier to establish. You must prove with concrete evidence and especially with credible testimony that your life is at risk if there’s a possibility of being returned to your country of origin.

The United States admits refugees from more than 60 countries around the world, whether it be people seeking political asylum or those fleeing dangerous environments. However, in 2017, the U.S. resettled fewer refugees than the rest of the world. Furthermore, arriving to America to ingress without a visa has become a national security matter.

“United States law does not allow free and/or uninspected admission into the country,” said Alpizar. “People at the border must expect a ‘zero tolerance’ policy in law enforcement.”

For people seeking refuge in the United States, whether it be from harm or unlawful prosecution in their country of origin or any other reason, Alpizar, who escaped Cuba on a raft in 1994 and came to America, shares the following three tips.

No. 1: Do not try or enter into U.S territory without inspection. Seek legal counsel and representation immediately. “People who unlawfully enter may be expressly deported or detained without bond up to the conclusion of his or her case,” noted Alpizar. “People seeking U.S. protection as a refugee can hire a lawyer or have legal assistance for his or her case.”

No. 2: Identify “credible fear.” Refugees can be interviewed to determine “credible fear” on whether or not one is returned to their country of origin. According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, if an individual is in expedited removal proceedings and found to have a credible fear of persecution or torture, they may seek asylum before an immigration judge. “To help determine this, bring with you all supporting evidence,” stressed Alpizar. “This includes your identification card, civil statistic documents and all relevant information of your case for credible fear to return.”

No. 3: Be effective and precise in details concerning your particular case. “Do not presume U.S. Border Patrol agents know the situation of your country, specifically if you are coming from countries with known totalitarian or undemocratic regimes,” concluded Alpizar. “Never presume your case will be easier to establish. You must prove with concrete evidence and especially with credible testimony that your life is at risk if there’s a possibility of being returned to your country of origin.”

About Santiago A. Alpizar, P.A.
In addition to immigration law, Santiago A. Alpizar P.A. focuses on criminal defense, insurance claims and real estate and corporate law. He has been a member of the Florida Bar since 2004 and is also a civil law notary and a public notary. Alpizar is a civic activist and a defender of fundamental rights in his native Cuba. For more information, please call the office at (305) 856-2494, cell phone at (305) 401-9560, or visit https://www.alpizarlawfirm.com/. The law office is located at 2250 SW 3rd Ave., Suite 202, Miami, FL 33129.

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