BAE Audio Preamplifiers Help Ignite Blaster, Scott Weiland's first Solo Album in Seven Years

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Former Stone Temple Pilots and Velvet Revolver Frontman Considers BAE Audio's DMP Preamplifier and a Vintage Neumann U47 The Perfect Combination for His Vocal Sound

The BAE Audio 312 module

. "We used the 312A preamplifier on the drums, guitars and bass. It's just a great overall mic pre."

As frontman of the iconic bands Stone Temple Pilots and Velvet Revolver, Scott Weiland's unique vocal delivery has left an indelible mark on rock music over the course of the last two decades. In addition to being a versatile recording artist and performer, Weiland is also owner of Burbank-based Lavish Studios, where he recorded his new album Blaster with The Wildabouts. Produced by Rick Parker (Black Rebel Motorcycle Club), Blaster is an amalgamation of inspired rock 'n' roll guitars and Weiland's trademark voice — all running through preamplifiers from BAE Audio.

"We've used BAE Audio all over the album," Weiland says. "We used the 312A preamplifier on the drums, guitars and bass. It's just a great overall mic pre." Since Stone Temple Pilots achieved international success in 1993, Weiland's voice has been a distinguishing element in all his music — which has always been rooted primarily in rock, but has also touched on a diverse range of influences including psychedelia, blues, even Bossa nova. Over the years — including on Blaster — one of the common technical threads in helping him achieve his vocal sound has been BAE Audio.

"Throughout my career, from the beginning of Core [STP's first album] all the way through this new album Blaster, I have always used vintage Neve or BAE Audio. I like the way the DMP Desktop Mic Pre sounds on my voice, whether I am singing in a gruff voice, a high head voice, or in a falsetto, it just seems to capture the tonality of my voice in a perfect way," Weiland explains.

The Voice of Authenticity
Weiland, who uses the BAE Audio DMP with a vintage Neumann U47, says the combination "...sounds flawless on my voice." The sound of the DMP preamplifier is derived from the same components that are found in the original 1073 and 1084 console modules. Each DMP unit is sold with the 'Bootsy Collins' mod, which consists of a Jensen DI transformer to create the first 1073 direct box. The BAE Audio DMP, which is hand wired using the original 1073 circuit diagrams, includes a built in power supply for extra portability.

In addition to relying it as a staple in his own studio, Weiland is looking forward to putting the DMP preamplifier to work on the road to capture his vocal delivery the stage. "I am looking forward to trying this live, and I'm sure it will sound great," he says.

Blaster, which is scheduled for release on March 31st, is being accompanied by a multi-date North American tour, with stops in the U.K. in early April and Canadian Music Week in early May. The tour also features Queens of the Stone Age drummer, Joey Castillo, who joined the touring group for its SXSW performances in March.

Watch the Scott Weiland video here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UY4QRC219jI
Learn more about BAE Audio's DMP Desktop Mic Pre: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IpFebtmFyUo

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Jeff Touzeau
Hummingbird Media
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