Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation Launches a New Campaign Celebrating The Faces of CP

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The Ongoing Curation of Photos Will Highlight The Personal Side of CP

Faces of CP will be an ongoing curation of photos of the real people living with and managing CP, helping readers learn more about what each person loves, what motivates them, and how they navigate the world with cerebral palsy.

What does the face of cerebral palsy look like? Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation (CPARF) is proud to present a visual narrative of the disability through their powerful new campaign, Faces of CP. Launching today on FacesOfCP.org to coincide with National Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month, the campaign showcases the personal side of CP, including images and the stories behind them.

More than 18 million people worldwide have cerebral palsy and CPARF aims to highlight as many of their stories as possible. Faces of CP will be an ongoing curation of photos of the real people living with and managing CP, helping readers learn more about what each person loves, what motivates them, and how they navigate the world with cerebral palsy.

Below are some examples of the memorable stories you can expect to see:

Naomi Joyner has been receiving physical therapy since she was just six months old and occupational therapy since she was two. Though she is nonverbal, her smile says it all. Friends and family describe her as a “ball of positivity” and the “definition of resilience.” Naomi’s favorite movies are Happy Feet and Trolls, and she loves lights and music.

Jack Tarrant’s stunning blue eyes and cheerful personality leave an impression on everyone he meets. He is left-handed and has left-side hemiplegia and uses his spasticity as a superpower, rearranging couches to create better hiding spots for hide and seek. Jack adores his big sisters, affectionately referred to as Roo and YaYa, who have helped him develop in more ways than could ever be quantified.

Sharon Klein proudly serves as a clinical social worker in private practice and as a school social worker at a local elementary school. She sees kids who’ve faced unimaginable challenges, and having cerebral palsy allows her to empathize deeply with them. Sharon adores her family and loves spending time with them and her girlfriends, and has a passion for cheering others on as they seek to achieve their goals.

CPARF is a nonprofit organization that funds cutting-edge research aimed at advancing treatments and therapies for people living with cerebral palsy, the most common physical disability in childhood. Their current research pillars focus on stem cell therapy, chronic pain management and prevention, and assistive technology that creates communication pathways, including thought-to-speech technology. There is currently no known cure for cerebral palsy, but recent advances in CPARF’s understanding of the brain and new medical technologies are changing the game.

Discover more at FacesOfCP.org and complete CPARF’s online questionnaire.

About CPARF
Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation was established in the United States in 2015 to fund the world’s best research to treat, prevent, and ultimately find a cure for cerebral palsy. The foundation has a strong commitment to funding high-quality cerebral palsy research, collaborating with researchers across the United States, and sharing their information globally. In the past 10 years, 58% of the most effective cerebral palsy treatments have been discovered thanks to the collective efforts of the international cerebral palsy research community.

To learn more about how CPARF is committed to innovating and making breakthroughs for people with cerebral palsy, visit cparf.org or contact info(at)cparf.org.

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