Fashion / Textile Industry Reeling: Still Producing More Greenhouse Gas Emissions Than Aviation and Shipping Combined

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AOC and Other Politicians Can't Force the Rest of the World to Take Care of the Earth. But Maybe Products Like Christopher J Apparel's Manhattan Project Can

Since the US is a small fraction of the earth’s population and we couldn’t possibly tell them how to run their countries, the environmental movement and doomsday predictions seem pointless. Or is it?

In early 2018, HBO produced a documentary available now on YouTube entitled “Fashion's Crippling Impact On The Environment Is Only Getting Worse”. One high-end fashion designer Christopher J Apparel (http://www.christopherjapparel.com) is doing their part to curb the fashion industry’s polluting ways. Owner Christopher Coriale has created a sort of "Swiss Army Shirt" called The Manhattan from a newer fabric known as TENCEL.

The documentary estimates that from 2015 to 2030, the sheer amount of textiles produced in the world will almost double to 102 Million Tons. At that rate, the industry would need 35% more land and an eye-popping 50% more water.

Two years later? Little has changed.

Politicians like to capitalize on environmental problems and assert that unless we act urgently, dire consequences are sure to follow. For example, freshman congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has said that Miami will be “underwater” within 12 years if we don’t act now and has also promoted her now infamous “green new deal” proposal.

Opponents of these politicians as well as critics often point to the fact that the US has a stellar report card in its attempts to protect the environment as compared to other nations. Since the US is a small fraction of the earth’s population and we couldn’t possibly tell them how to run their countries, the environmental movement and doomsday predictions seem pointless.
Or is it?

One of the best ways we can get other countries to make better environmental choices is to lead the way and vote with our wallets: the more environmentally friendly fabrics and clothing WE purchase, the better off the world will be overall.

For example, some businesses outside of fashion have already taken genius steps to do their part: One microbrewery in Miami found they not only could create their own edible 6-pack can-holders out of their wheat and barley bi-products instead of using the standard plastic variety, they saved money also.

Similarly, Christopher J Apparel's (http://www.christopherjapparel.com) The Manhattan from a newer fabric known as TENCEL. Coriale refers to it as a "Swiss Army Shirt" because it can be used as a t-shirt, undershirt, workout shirt, and "significant other" sleep shirt.

This fabric has a lot going for it: Not only is it luxuriously soft and is more durable, it also takes a fraction of the amount of water to produce and uses sustainable material. While the shirt is assembled and stitched in the USA, the fabric is purchased and shipped from China.

The documentary references a “circular economy” where instead of raw materials moving linearly from creation to use to a landfill, the raw materials used in the fashion industry would “circle back” to other stages like raw materials and never create waste to begin with.

Until that happens, buying higher quality, durable and sustainable clothing made of Tencel such as the Manhattan from Christopher J, is a great step forward.

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Chris Coriale

Norm Jones
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