AT&T Introduces IoT Platform, Jason Hope and Forbes Find It Promising

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The one technological problem that is holding back the Internet of Things from reaching its full potential is the lack of standards and consistency in the field, but AT&T hopes to change that with an Internet of Things development platform. Jason Hope and Forbes agree that this could help solve one of the biggest problems in the IoT world.

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Flow Designer provides pre-configured nodes for designers to use. These nodes provide access to multiple data sources, including cloud services and various communication methods.

AT&T has announced its Internet of Things development platform, the M2X Data Service, which may help to solve one of the biggest hurdles developers of connected devices are facing. According to Jason Hope and an article in Forbes, M2X Data Service may help developers collect, share and analyze the data from connected developers. It will also include API access, developer tools and testing tools.

According to the January 22 article by Ben Kepes entitled "AT&T Introduces M2X to Ease Internet of Things Development," the new platform is a managed service for developers that will come with all of the tools and access needed to develop new devices, as well as three free test SIMs with AT&T connectivity.

Yet, according to Forbes, Flow Designer, one of the products in the new platform, may be its most promising feature. Jason Hope, futurist and entrepreneur, agrees. "Flow Designer provides pre-configured nodes for designers to use. These nodes provide access to multiple data sources, including cloud services and various communication methods. All the developer has to do is connect the dots to create the Internet of Things application, and Flow provides a visual format they can see to map out what they are doing."

The power of Flow was shown at AT&T's annual Hackathon in Las Vegas. Here, 700 developers joined forces to build Internet of Things applications in just 48 hours. Among those apps developed at the forum were the Anti-Snoozer, a device to help keep drivers from dozing off at the wheel, and GreenGuest, an app designed to help hotel guests understand their energy and water use while staying at the hotel. Anti-Snoozer was the Grand Prize winner at the event.

"If valuable, functional apps can be built in just 48 hours," said Jason Hope, "the potential for this platform is huge."

About Jason Hope

Jason Hope resides in Scottsdale, Arizona, where he watches the development of the Internet of Things with increasing excitement. He uses his wealth as an entrepreneur to re-invest in the local and national community. Learn more about his work at http://www.jasonhope.com.

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