FutureAI CEO Presents Brain Simulator II at International AGI Conference

Share Article

New Open Source Software Project at Virtual Conference AGI-20, in St. Petersburg, Russia

This image shows the Brain Simulator II with its basic neuron array with modules backed by programming to implement specific AI algorithms.

Noted expert on AI and software developer, Simon, will discuss how Brain Simulator II, an open-source software project, enables experimentation into diverse AI algorithms to create an end-to-end AGI system.

Brain Simulator II – a software platform for proving how Artificial General Intelligence (AGI), the next phase of AI, will emerge – will be the focus of a paper to be presented by FutureAI CEO, Charles Simon at AGI-20.

Noted expert on AI and software developer, Simon, will discuss how Brain Simulator II, an open-source software project, enables experimentation into diverse AI algorithms to create an end-to-end AGI system.

Seamlessly marrying spiking neural networks with symbolic AI algorithms, Brain Simulator II features modules for vision, hearing, robotic control, learning, internal modeling, planning, imagination, and forethought.

AGI-20 is the preeminent annual conference on Artificial General Intelligence. Taking place June 23-26 as a virtual conference due to the coronavirus pandemic, the physical AGI-20 conference tentatively has been rescheduled to be held from September 16-19 in St. Petersburg, Russia.    

Noting the significance of the annual AGI conferences, which are organized by the Artificial General Intelligence Society in cooperation with the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, Simon contends, “New, unique algorithms that simulate biological neural circuits and directly address cognition are the key to advancing AI and ultimately helping it to evolve into AGI.”

According to Simon, the Brain Simulator II platform is able to combine vision and touch into a single mental model. “As a result, it is making progress toward the comprehension of causality and the passage of time,” he explains. “As the modules are enhanced, progressively more intelligence will emerge.”

A unique feature of the Brain Simulator is the introduction of the Universal Knowledge Store which can link information from multiple sources in a biologically plausible way. The Brain Simulator’s virtual entity receives inputs from vision, hearing, and touch and merges it into the knowledge store. Combined, this information provides the basis for understanding that words represent things in an objective reality, how causes lead to effects, and the ability to imagine and plan—all necessary prerequisites for true, humanlike intelligence.

Simon anticipates near-term development for Brain Simulator II will include improved and expanded sensory inputs, expansion of language capabilities, and the ability for the virtual entity to move objects in its environment. This will allow exploration into how the entity learns the basic physics of objects and uses this knowledge to plan object motions to achieve goals.

The proceedings of AGI-20 will be published as a book in Springer’s Lecture Notes in AI series, and all accepted papers will be available online.

In advance of AGI-20, anyone interested in Brain Simulator II can participate in the development process by downloading the software, suggesting new features, and (for advanced developers) adding custom modules. Visit http://brainsim.org. Follow Charles Simon on Twitter at https://twitter.com/futureai3.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Matthew Pugh
@PughTillerPR
Follow >
Visit website