Early Freezes are Possible in the Northern U.S.

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Harris-Mann Climatology, a long-range weather and commodity forecasting service, predicts a 60 percent chance of freezing temperatures north of I-90 by early to mid-September.

Much colder air is already building in northwestern Canada and the Yukon. There is a 60 percent chance that this Arctic air will head southward into the north-central U.S. by early to mid September

"New weather patterns are starting to favor much colder weather moving in from northwestern Canada and the Yukon in the near future," says Harris-Mann Climatologist Cliff Harris.

The wet spring season delayed soybean crops across the northern U.S. Many of these crops are still likely to be immature in late August and early to mid-September. This could be a problem as Harris-Mann Climatology's forecasters are predicting early freezes across southern Canada and the northern U.S. near the Great Lakes around that time, especially north of I-90.

Chilly temperatures have already been reported in the upper 30s and lower 40s during the last week of July near the Great Lakes. Record cold was also gauged at International Falls, Minnesota earlier in July as readings dropped into the upper 20s and 30s.

According to Harris, "Much colder air is already building in northwestern Canada and the Yukon. There is a 60 percent chance that this Arctic air will head southward into the north-central U.S. by early to mid-September dropping temperatures to near or below freezing. An event like this has happened before and is similar to the patterns in 1981, 1992, 2003 and especially in 1974 when hard freezes wiped out a large percentage of both corn and soybeans north of I-80. Grain and soybean prices skyrocketed with corn nearly doubling its value! Cattle feeders and consumers later felt the effects of that freeze to a great degree."

Another reason for the colder weather in the near future is the cooler than normal sea-surface temperature event, La Nina.

Meteorologist Randy Mann says, "Sea-surface temperatures in the south-central Pacific Ocean have been cooling down. In late 2012, ocean waters were in a ‘La Nada’ or in-between the warmer El Nino and cooler La Nina sea-surface temperature event. However, it now appears that we’re in a weak La Nina event which favors early freezes near the Canadian/U.S. border after Labor Day."

Harris-Mann Climatology has a daily advisory service that specializes in providing state of the art short and long-range weather analysis plus fundamental and technical mathematical stock and commodity forecasts. Many investors depend on this service to track grain, soybean and other commodity futures both mathematically and fundamentally. The company also provides free detailed monthly temperature and precipitation forecasts for most U.S. and world cities on their website at http://www.LongRangeWeather.com.

“We’re still in a pattern of wild weather ‘extremes,’ the worst in more than 1,000 years, since the days of Leif Ericsson. It's a pattern that began in the late 1960s and is likely to continue until at least the early to mid 2030s,” according to Harris.

For more detailed information about Harris-Mann Climatology’s services, go to their website at http://www.LongRangeWeather.com.

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