“How to Become a Neonatal Nurse” was Posted By The Authority Nursing Career Site Nursing100.com

A new guide detailing what is needed to become a Neonatal Nurse, published by the number-one online nursing resource, was just released here: http://nursing100.com/neonatal-nurse/.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friend

Neonatal Nurse Career Guide

With level of information available in this nursing career guide, both aspiring and working nurses have all the information they will ever need to make nursing a satisfying and rewarding career choice.

Columbus, OH (PRWEB) February 18, 2014

Author of this nursing career guide, Elizabeth Hansen, said the report, which persons searching for the requirements to become a Neonatal Nurse, covers such details as Salary Data, Job Description, Education, Certification & Licensing, Job Outlook, plus several resourceful Links.

“With level of information available in this nursing career guide, both aspiring and working nurses have all the information they will ever need to make nursing a satisfying and rewarding career choice.

The Neonatal Nurse Career Guide is a publication of nursing100.com, which is an authority on nursing careers. It specifically and exclusively targets persons wanting to learn more about the details of specific nursing specialities or those thinking of getting into the nursing career but may want to look up salary statistics first to see if the job will meet their financial needs.

The nursing career guide, which provides a one-stop place where persons can find information and details pertaining to salary, job description, education, certification and licensing requirement and job outlook, gives a comprehensive treatment to the speciality of neonatal nursing. Hansen believes the profession has helped to reduce significantly the newborn mortality rate in the twentieth century.

The neonatal nurse median salary, in the United States is about $65,000 per year. The lowest 10 percent earn about $44,190 per year, while the highest 10 percent earn $95,130.

Nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit, according the guide’s author Hansen, usually make more than a generalized registered nurse. However, factors like geographic location, level of experience, education and certification also impact one’s take home salary.

“The facility you work for also plays a role, as larger hospitals usually pay a higher salary than smaller hospital systems,” Hansen.

The job outlook for neonatal nurses is very strong and is expected to grow by 26 percent between 2010 and 2020, according to Hansen. She believes that the figure is actually faster than the national average and it is faster than general registered nursing, which is expected to grow by 22 percent between 2010 and 2020.

However, with birthrates falling throughout the country and the US population is aging, Hansen said neonatal nurses are still in demand.

“This is because there are not even enough to cover the current need, as inner cities and rural areas are in particular need of this type of nurse. The reason is that there are far too many patients who need such services compared to how many nurses are able to offer it,” said Hansen.

For a more detailed and comprehensive treatment of the Neonatal Nurse Guide, please visit the following website: http://nursing100.com/.

Author Bio
JC McClain is the senior editor for Nursing100.com


Contact

  • JC McClain
    Cloud Technology Systems, Inc.
    +1 (614) 300-3544
    Email
Follow us on: Contact's Google Plus