Susan Cho Figenshau, P.C. Comments on the Effects of President Obama's Executive Action on Immigration Reform

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Trusted immigration attorney reacts to President Obama's recent executive action for immigration reform, and the pros and cons of this reform.

Immigration Attorney
A comprehensive overhaul is what’s needed, but absent that, at least President Obama’s promise of executive action includes some attention to national security/technology, improvement in wages for Immigration.

Susan Cho Figenshau, attorney for Susan Cho Figenshau, P.C., has commented on the President's recent actions regarding immigration. More than 20 years experience in immigration law has provided Figenshau with the experience to see what kind of changes need to be made in the immigration system.

President Obama's immigration reform plans "will help secure the border, hold nearly 5 million undocumented immigrants accountable, and ensure that everyone plays by the same rules," according to a White House press release.

Figenshau sees a lot of work to be done in order to make the immigration system run more smoothly, but sees promise in the President's plans.

“A comprehensive overhaul is what’s needed, but absent that, at least President Obama’s promise of executive action includes some attention to national security/technology, improvement in wages for Immigration and Customs Enforcement personnel, and some relief to the drawn-out permanent residency process for the hundreds of thousands of foreign-born professionals who are contributing to our nation’s businesses while obeying US immigration laws," says Figenshau.

According to CNBC's November 20 article, "Obama: 'Our immigration system is broken, and everybody knows it,'" "The three main elements of the actions will be cracking down on illegal immigration at the border; deporting felons, but not families; and establishing criminal background checks and taxes for undocumented immigrants."

Figenshau sees potential promise, but notes the executive action is void of substantial improvement for professionals residing and working in the U.S. legally. “What’s really needed is relief for the hundreds of thousands of foreign-born professionals who are contributing to our economy and enduring the burden, cost, and insecurity of extending temporary immigration status while lawfully pursuing the permanent residency process," Figenshau says.

"By registering and passing criminal and national security background checks, millions of undocumented immigrants will start paying their fair share of taxes and temporarily stay in the U.S. without fear of deportation for three years at a time," the White House release said.

Additionally, if undocumented immigrants submit to these background checks, register with the government, pay fees and show they have a child born in the U.S., they "will have the opportunity to request temporary relief from deportation and work authorization for three years at a time."

Susan Cho Figenshau, notes that while millions of undocumented persons may get some relief from the executive order, it remains to be seen what changes will actually be implemented -- especially changes relative to professionals who are long-time contributors to the U.S.

"Because our Constitution vests Congress the exclusivity with respect to creating new laws, Congress can make impotent -- or at least attempt to render impotent -- executive action by legislation, or refusal to fund actions or programs required to carry out executive action,” she says.

About Susan Cho Figenshau, P.C.

Susan Cho Figenshau, P.C. is an immigration lawyer with 20 years of experience in immigration law. She represents employers in numerous fields, including technology, telecommunications, healthcare, educational and more. To learn more, visit http://strictlyimmigration.com

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