Class Action Suit Claims Lenovo Sold Faulty Notebook Computers Using Misleading Marketing Tactics; Parker Waichman LLP, Whitfield Bryson & Mason LLP Represent Plaintiffs

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A class action lawsuit filed with the Superior Court for the District of Columbia alleges that Lenovo engaged in deceptive marketing practices to sell defective notebook computers; Parker Waichman LLP and Whitfield Bryson & Mason LLP are serving as attorneys for the Plaintiffs.

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These Ultrabook notebook computers were unable to connect to Wi-Fi and/or obtain Wi-Fi speeds fast enough to allow for even basic mobile Internet browsing when near a Wi-Fi networking source.

Parker Waichman LLP, a national law firm dedicated to protecting the rights of consumers, working with Washington, D.C.-based Whitfield Bryson & Mason LLP, on Oct. 22 filed with the Superior Court for the District of Columbia a class action lawsuit against Lenovo Inc. (Michael Wheeler et al v. Lenovo Inc., Case No. 13-0007150). The lawsuit stems from allegations that the company sold defective notebook computers using deceptive marketing practices in the process.

According to the Complaint, consumers bought the Lenovo IdeaPad U Series Ultrabook notebook computers believing the products were capable of working at standard wireless (Wi-Fi) speeds, from standard ranges. However, contrary to Lenovo's promotional materials that supported such Wi-Fi-related claims, these Ultrabook notebook computers were unable to connect to Wi-Fi and/or obtain Wi-Fi speeds fast enough to allow for basic mobile Internet browsing when near a Wi-Fi networking source, according to court documents. The lawsuit further alleges that the computers contain an inherent defect that prevents them from offering basic Wi-Fi functionality. Consequently, the lawsuit charges, these IdeaPad Ultrabooks are unfit for their intended purpose of wireless and/or mobile computing, and are unable to perform as Lenovo's marketing materials and warranties imply.

The Complaint further alleges that Lenovo responded to charges of a defect in the notebook series by admitting to the existence of an unidentified hardware defect, which it described as being the cause of the problem. The Complaint notes that, according to Lenovo, IdeaPad U Series Ultrabooks manufactured after July 23, 2012, were given a hardware design update to fix the defect. However, computers in the series still have the defect, according to the Complaint. In addition, the Complaint highlights that the Defendant knew of the defect while it was putting updated computers on the market and launching promotional campaigns to help support sales.

If you or someone you know has purchased a Lenovo IdeaPad notebook computer, you may have valuable legal rights. To discuss your case with one of our lawyers, please view our Lenovo IdeaPad Ultrabook Class Action Lawsuits page or call 1-800-LAW-INFO (1-800-529-4636).

Contact:
Parker Waichman LLP
Jordan Chaikin, Partner
1+ (800) LAW-INFO
1+ (800) 529-4636
http://www.yourlawyer.com

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Gary Falkowitz
Parker Waichman LLP

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