Making a Business of Caring: Women Entrepreneurs in the Aging Life Care Profession®

Share Article

Women entrepreneurs are a driving force in the Aging Life Care Profession. In recognition of National Women's Small Business Month, the Aging Life Care Association (ALCA) took a closer look at the women making a business of caring. The ALCA survey finds that 83% of the women members own their own business and 50% of those have been in business for more than ten years.

Helping family caregivers – who happen to be primarily women – find support, resources and peace of mind often helps them return to work or to focus on their work more easily without risk of having to leave a job or sideline their career track.

As a national association comprised mostly of women, the Aging Life Care Association® (ALCA) recently took a closer look at the entrepreneurial spirit fueling the Aging Life Care™ profession. A recent poll of ALCA female members reveals that 84% are small business owners. And of those women that do not own their own business, half work for a woman-owned small business.

And their business? Providing guidance and care management for older adults and others facing ongoing health challenges. These women entrepreneurs have made a business of helping and caring for others.

“Helping family caregivers – who happen to be primarily women – find support, resources and peace of mind often helps them return to work or to focus on their work more easily without risk of having to leave a job or sideline their career track,” says Kate Granigan, an ALCA member and practicing Aging Life Care Manager® in the greater Boston area.

Most of the women surveyed did not begin their Aging Life Care career with the end goal of owning a business, but rather came to entrepreneurship out of the drive to offer more for their aging or disabled clients.

“I come from a clinical background and had almost no business experience,” says Granigan. “But I realized if I weren’t confined by a pre-set system and could think outside the box, that I could make a greater impact on my client.”

Lisa Kaufman, a small business owner and Aging Life Care Professional from Atlanta, started her practice because she wanted to be an advocate for her clients. “The elderly, in my experience, seemed invisible to their providers and I knew I had to change that,” says Kaufman.

Both women discovered they are better employers because of the nature of their business. “Employees respond well to a supportive and flexible work environment,” says Granigan. “My staff – primarily women – have a fulfilling career along with the flexibility to raise their families, be active parents, as well as assist in caring for their own parents as well.”

Kaufman agrees. “The impact we are having on the ‘sandwich generation’ is vast. By more efficiently managing the care of their aging mother, we give those in the sandwich generation the ability to focus on their family and career without sacrificing quality care.”

While 50% of the women entrepreneurs of ALCA have been in business for more than ten years, a new generation of small business owners is on the rise with 20% of members in their first three years of business.

“It’s an exciting time for our profession – not only for the women business owners, but for all of our members with entrepreneurial spirit,” says Taney Hamill, ALCA’s Chief Executive Officer. “The ‘silver tsunami’ is here and our professionals are at the ready with the highest standards of care management. As an association we equip members with business skills and a unique network of mentorship and knowledge base that cannot be found anywhere else.”

ABOUT the Aging Life Care Association® (ALCA): ALCA was formed in 1985 to advance dignified care for older adults and their families in the United States. Aging Life Care Professionals® have extensive training and experience working with older adults, people with disabilities and families who need assistance with caregiving issues. They assist families in the search for a suitable nursing home placement or extended care if the need occurs. The practice of Aging Life Care™ and the role of care providers have captured a national spotlight, as generations of Baby Boomers age in the United States and abroad. For more information or to access a nationwide directory of Aging Life Care Professionals, please visit aginglifecare.org.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Callie Daters

C. Taney Hamill, CEO
@AgingLifeCare
since: 08/2012
Follow >
Aging Life Care Association
Like >
Visit website