Oakland Attorney Claude D. Ames Joins Mediation.com Network of Mediators to Expand Online Presence

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Oakland attorney Claude D. Ames has joined Mediation.com to share his knowledge and expertise. Ames has ten years of experience as a mediator and arbitrator in the Oakland area.

Claude Dawson Ames Mediation Attorney | Mediation Attorney in California | Mediation.com

Claude Dawson Ames Mediation Attorney | Mediation Attorney in California | Mediation.com

There are many different things you can do to reach a decision and certain accommodations can be made to keep both parties happy. —Claude Ames

Oakland attorney Claude D. Ames recently announced his affiliation with Mediation.com, a leading mediation portal as part of its vast attorney-mediator network. As an arbitrator and mediation attorney, Ames believes that every case should not go to court. He mediates cases involving business, family and employment law.

“Courts in California already have a backlog of cases waiting for trial or settlement conferences,” Ames said. “Some people wait for years before their case is settled or heard in court. Mediation is a way to settle the cases quickly and save both parties on court costs. The fee for mediation can be split between both parties.”

Ames has been mediating cases for the past 10 years. He explains the benefits of mediation on his blog. “Mediation is confidential,” Ames said. “There are no court reporters or judges so there are no public records. Mediation allows both parties to participate and have a part in the process.”

While mediation can keep a case out of court, it’s not a cut and dried process, Ames said. Creativity is an important part of the process. “There are many different things you can do to reach a decision and certain accommodations can be made to keep both parties happy,” Ames said.

Ames also serves as an arbitrator for cases involving employment and commercial law. Arbitrators hear both sides and help make decisions about the cases and like mediation, the decisions are kept private. These decisions are either binding or non-binding.

“Arbitration can either be binding or non-binding. A binding Arbitration cannot be appealed, and is legally sound,” Ames said. “A non-binding Arbitration can be appealed and takes recommendations into consideration.”

A graduate of the University of California at Berkley, Ames received his law degree from the Hastings College of Law. He has served as an attorney, mediator and arbitrator in the Oakland, California for the past ten years. He works with commercial and labor arbitration and has mediated a variety of cases. He also represents clients in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy cases.

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