Tulane School of Professional Advancement Offers CSI Summer Course

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Tulane School of Professional Advancement students from all applied degree programs can earn undergraduate credit through a week-long summer course entitled Techniques of Facial Reconstruction.

The class is a good match for a variety of disciplines—those interested in facial anatomy, sculpting, law enforcement investigation and general interest, said forensic artist Roy Paschal.

Aspiring crime scene investigators and those interested in art can take the Techniques of Facial Reconstruction course at Tulane School of Professional Advancement from July 24-29 and earn three hours of undergraduate credit.

In conjunction with the Southern Institute of Forensic Science, this weeklong course is returning to Tulane’s Uptown Campus for a second year and will be taught by Roy Paschal, a well-known forensic artist, retired from the South Carolina State Crime Laboratory.

“The class is a good match for a variety of disciplines—those interested in facial anatomy, sculpting, law enforcement investigation and general interest,” Paschal said.

All majors are invited to take part in this innovative summer course with last year’s class roster including students in applied degree programs for fine art, criminal justice, homeland security and nursing. For those looking to go back to college, the course is also open to the public and no prior sculpturing experience is required.

Students will have the method they see on popular crime television dramas at their fingertips as they learn the 3-D technique of facial reconstruction. This process allows a face to be constructed using modeling clay. A skull casting from an actual forensic case will be used for the class. At the conclusion of the course, students will be provided with a real photograph of the victim to determine the accuracy of their reconstruction.

Law enforcement often uses this technique as a method to identify unknown individuals. Museums have also used this method for historical recreations. This facial reconstruction process has been used in displays at Jamestown, as well as for reconstructions of soldiers from Custer’s Last Stand, King Tut, Ivan the Terrible, Mozart and Francisco Pizarro. One of Roy Paschal’s reconstructions of a Spanish conquistador is on display in the Anthropology office on Tulane’s Uptown Campus.

The Southern Institute of Forensic Science hopes to continue to offer this course with Tulane School of Professional Advancement and teach this technique every summer. Tuition is $1,000.

For more information, contact Dr. Ed Waldrip, Executive Director of the Southern Institute of Forensic Science at edwaldrip(at)msn(dot)com or (601) 310-6531, or call Tulane School of Professional Advancement at (504) 865-555. The Uptown Campus is located at 6823 St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans, LA 70118. More information about the school and degree programs can be found at sopa.tulane.edu.

The School of Professional Advancement offers high-quality, innovative degree and certificate programs in the humanities and in applied fields that are directly relevant to the needs and interests of working adults. The faculty, most of whom are working professionals, ensure programs stay cutting edge and relevant, helping graduates to maximize the value of their degrees. The School of Professional Advancement currently offers 26 undergraduate programs of study and four master’s degree programs at its three campuses. New online courses will also be available Fall 2017.

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