Peanut Patch Treatment is on the horizon for those with Peanut Allergy

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Epicutaneous, or “skin patch”, peanut immunotherapy may become the first FDA-approved form of therapy for peanut allergy.

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Asthma and Allergy Treatment Specialists in Colorado Springs, Pueblo, Cañon City

One of the happiest moments was when I wrote a letter saying that he no longer had to sit at the ‘peanut-free table’ at school. Now the Peanut Patch Treatment will make the process just that much easier. - Daniel F. Soteres M.D., MPH

“Peanut desensitization or Oral Immunotherapy (OIT) protocols have been around for several years”, says Daniel F. Soteres, M.D., of Asthma and Allergy Associates, P.C., in Colorado Springs. “I’ve been doing these protocols for at least 4 years. It’s very fulfilling. I remember our first patient, Luke. One of the happiest moments was when I wrote a letter saying that he no longer had to sit at the ‘peanut-free table’ at school. Now the Peanut Patch Treatment will make the process just that much easier.”

Applying a daily skin patch that releases peanut protein is safe and effective for peanut immunotherapy. Skin patch therapy, is also medically referred to as “epicutaneous” therapy. The Viaskin® Peanut’s Efficacy and Safety (VIPES) study was reviewed at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology February 2015 in Houston. Dr. Hugh Sampson summarized the data from the study.

Of the 221 peanut-allergic patients involved in the study, 51% were children, 33% were adolescents, and 16% were adults. All underwent a double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge at baseline to establish the threshold peanut dose at which they reacted. The patients were randomly assigned to wear a daily patch that delivered a 50 µg, 100 µg, or 250 µg of peanut or placebo. For children younger than 12 years, the patch was placed on the back by a parent; for older children and adults, it was placed on the arm.

What about safety for this innovative therapy? Mild symptoms like itchiness in the mouth and throat, nausea, and stomach ache were reported, but about 4% to 5% do require therapy for systemic symptoms. Only 6% of subjects dropped out, which is quite low for any immunotherapy trial. Two of the subjects dropped out due to flare ups of eczema (atopic dermatitis) at the site of the patch placement.

Dr. Soteres, of Colorado Springs’ Asthma & Allergy Associates, has performed Oral Immunotherapy or Peanut Desensitization in numerous children, and one adult.

For more information, contact Dr. Daniel F. Soteres, or the other board-certified food allergy doctors Dr. Robert Nathan and Dr. Luke Webb, of Asthma & Allergy Associates, P.C.

There are four Southern Colorado locations. In Colorado Springs, call (719) 473-0872. In Pueblo, call (719) 564-2503. In Cañon City, call (800) 533-3900. Or visit http://aacos.com to schedule a consultation today!

Practice Contact Information:
Asthma and Allergy Associates
2709 North Tejon St
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80907
Main Office Phone Number: (719) 473-0872

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Paul Byer
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since: 01/2011
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