Scholarship Program for Male African American High School Seniors at Select Schools in MD, DC, VA and PA

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Diamond in the Rough Scholarship applications will be accepted until May 29

Diamond in the Rough

The Paula E. Waters Diamond in the Rough Scholarship Fund is now accepting scholarship applications for the 2020-21 academic school year.

Three (3) scholarships will be awarded to male African American high school seniors with a cumulative GPA between 2.0-2.99 currently attending Westinghouse High School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania or any public or charter school in Montgomery or Prince George’s County, Maryland; the District of Columbia; or Arlington County, Fairfax County, Alexandria or Falls Church, Virginia.

Recipients must also be enrolled or plan to enroll in a trade-related program at an accredited four-year or two-year college, vocational or technical school in the US.

According to President and Founder Paula Waters, providing financial assistance through this scholarship program helps to “empower ‘diamond in the rough’ African American male youth who have potential and desire to further their education who would not be sought out by a college, university or vocational-technical school”.

The deadline to apply is May 29, 2020. Interested students can learn more about the program and start the application process by visiting programs.applyISTS.com/Diamond-in-the-Rough. Applicants will be evaluated based on community involvement, extracurricular activities and essay or video content.

International Scholarship and Tuition Services, Inc. (ISTS), an independent scholarship management company, hosts the online application process, selects recipients and disburses awards for the program.

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About the Diamond in the Rough Scholarship Fund
Founded in 2004, Paula E. Waters-Diamond in the Rough Scholarship Fund (PaulaWaters-DITR) is an organization dedicated to providing financial assistance to deserving African American male youth. The organization established the scholarship program and designed it to reward disadvantaged African American male high school students who have potential and desire to further their education and who may otherwise find college or vocational-technical school unaffordable.

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Carissa Miller
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