Serenity Releases New Years Safety Plan for Those in Recovery

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To start the New Year safely and maintain sobriety, Serenity Recovery Center issues a guide for addicts in recovery.

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The first holiday season without drugs or alcohol can often be the most challenging, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that subsequent years will be a breeze.

For many, holidays are connected to partying. Just as Thanksgiving might mean a party with food, and Independence Day a party with fireworks, New Year’s Eve is often equated with drinking.

That can mean a very unsafe new year, when accidents and emergency room visits rise. For those in recovery, it can make the start of the New Year a time of potential dangers, such as a relapse.

To help ensure a safe and happy New Year for all of our state’s residents, Serenity Recovery Center in Marne has issued a safety plan for the New Year.

Addiction is dangerous, but relapse is perhaps even more so. More accidental overdoses occur during a relapse than at any other time. Perhaps addicts return to previous usage levels, before treatment, but their bodies do not handle it the same way. In some cases, the drugs themselves may be more potent than whenever someone last used.

For alcoholics in recovery (as well as any other kind of addiction) the stressors of the holiday season—family and work gatherings, financial stress, and so on—together with the drinking-related atmosphere of the holidays, can make for a dangerous combination. Addiction recovery is a lifelong process, with disease management comparable to that of other chronic diseases such as hypertension or diabetes. Just as a diabetic cannot forget dietary recommendations and binge safely, an alcoholic in recovery needs to continuously manage the disease.

During the treatment process, addicts learn many life skills, including coping mechanisms for times of stress and avoidance options when faced with temptation. The first holiday season without drugs or alcohol can often be the most challenging, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that subsequent years will be a breeze. Friends and loved ones can go a long ways toward helping, particularly for an individual recently out of treatment.

Communities can also play a part in a safe New Year, with addiction education for prevention, as well as substance-free activities in the community from those who wish to abstain from drugs or alcohol while celebrating the New Year.

If you or a loved one are in recovery, check out the guide, available for free, on Serenity Recovery’s website.

To learn more about addiction, or to get help for yourself or a loved one, call 1-855-218-3775 or visit the Serenity Recovery website: http://www.serenityrehab.org

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Derry Hallmark
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