Serenity Discusses the Suicide Risks Behind Addiction During International Survivors Of Suicide Loss Day

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Serenity Recovery Center promotes understanding and unity in dealing with loss and recovery for families of suicide victims.

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Despite such a large-scale impact, suicidal thoughts, mood disorders and addiction often go unnoticed and undiagnosed, even with practitioners or family members.

Each November 19th, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention promotes a different kind of celebration, one where those who have lost a loved one to suicide gather at events around the world to reaffirm life, understanding, hope and survival. It’s called International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day, or Survivor Day for short. While suicide affects millions of Americans, directly or indirectly, those families dealing with a loved one with substance use disorders have an even greater risk. In honor of Survivor Day, Serenity Recovery Center seeks to advocate for individuals with addiction.

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, ahead of such conditions as hypertension or liver disease. While depression and other mood-related disorders are the number-one risk factor (according to the Centers for Disease Control), alcohol and drug abuse are a close second—even without depression. People with substance use disorders are about six times more likely to commit suicide than others in the general population.

Unfortunately, those that abuse drugs or alcohol are also more likely to experience depression or other mood disorders. Alcohol is itself a depressant, as well as certain other potentially addictive substances such as sedatives. Combine those risks with the fact that those suffering from a mood disorder may actually be self-medicating with drugs or alcohol, and you can see what a snarled situation it can be.

Despite such a large-scale impact, suicidal thoughts, mood disorders and addiction often go unnoticed and undiagnosed, even with practitioners or family members. Survivor Day, therefore, is about more than just empathy and connection for survivors, it is also about education and insight into effective prevention and treatment. Currently in this country, only about 11% of addicts get treatment. The Affordable Care Act made treatment more widely available, but stigma remains a factor for many.

By shedding a light on the risks of addiction and suicide, Serenity Recovery Center hopes to promote access to education and treatment for more families. Together, we can participate as community members in both drug-related prevention and effective treatment, individualized care which addresses the whole person—including such factors as mood disorders or suicide risk.

To learn more or to get help for yourself or a loved one, call 1-855-218-3775 or visit the Serenity Recovery website: http://www.serenityrehab.org

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Derry Hallmark
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