S.C. Auto Accident Lawyers Standeffer & Harbin Review Legal Developments in V2V Communication Systems

Attorneys review the implications of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s proposed rule requiring new cars to be equipped with vehicle-to-vehicle communication systems.

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Standeffer & Harbin

NHTSA proposes new rules to regulate vehicle-to-vehicle communication systems beginning in 2016.

There are both privacy concerns and security risks associated with the vehicle-to-vehicle communication technologies.

Greenville, S.C. (PRWEB) August 30, 2014

Auto accident law firm, Standeffer & Harbin urges car manufacturers and public agencies to provide robust security systems in new vehicle-to-vehicle communication systems in order to prevent hackers from accessing vehicles’ vital systems and causing accidents.

On Monday Aug. 18, 2014, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) issued a press release informing the public and auto manufacturers that vehicle-to-vehicle communication systems will be required in new vehicles sometime after 2016.

The NHTSA’s press release stated that vehicle-to-vehicle communication systems would decrease the number of accidents on the roads. Additionally, the federal agency stated that drivers would be able to understand when other cars are about to run a red light or are in the driver’s blind spot.

The August 2014 NHTSA safety report accompanying the NHTSA press release listed several safety concerns identified by the agency in vehicle-to-vehicle communication systems. On page 44 of the NHTSA safety report, the authors wrote “hackers or others could compromise V2V functionality and participant privacy.” The report also stated that the agency’s ability to review robust security apps for V2V technologies was limited by lack of funding.

Standeffer & Harbin attorneys express concerns that the new communication systems in cars may be exploited by hackers. Hackers who gain access to a vehicle’s internal systems may steal private information and cause accidents.

“If vehicle-to-vehicle communication technologies are going to be mandatory and ubiquitous in the future, then public agencies and private enterprises should be responsible for creating accompanying security measures. As the report notes, there is a very real risk that hackers will be able to remotely control vehicles and steal private information,” noted Anthony Harbin owner and senior partner of Standeffer & Harbin.

Standeffer & Harbin attorneys note that the car accident concerns associated with vehicle-to-vehicle communication systems are serious and must be addressed systematically and comprehensively.

“We firmly support the use of technology to reduce car accidents and car fatalities. At the same time, it is vital that car manufacturers are held responsible for producing robust communication systems that protect the privacy of drivers,” concluded Harbin.

About Standeffer & Harbin

Standeffer & Harbin is has extensive experience negotiating and litigating personal injury cases. The firm, based in Anderson, South Carolina, handles a variety of different claims including criminal law, auto accidents, defective products, dram shop liability, drunk driving and DUI, medical malpractice, motorcycle accidents, nursing home abuse, personal injury, slip and fall, social security disability, truck accidents, workers compensation and wrongful death. To contact Standeffer & Harbin for a free case review, visit shglawyers.com, or call 1 (800) 671-1158.