Study of SAC’s Role in Multiple Myeloma and Erythropoietin-Induced Osteoporosis

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Clinical Research Collaboration of CBHI and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute

CBHI and UAMS Collaborative Research

While we have had amazing recovery cases of patients with multiple myeloma undergoing SAC therapy, the collaborative research will help us to gain a deeper understanding of the healing pathways of SAC for multiple myeloma and erythropoietin-induced osteoporosis.

Calcium & Bone Health Institute (CBHI) and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute announced that they are engaged in collaborative research to study the efficacy of Sigma Anti-bonding Calcium (SAC) as a treatment option for patients with multiple myeloma and erythropoietin-included osteoporosis.

“We are truly excited to work with the University of Arkansas, which has the most comprehensive center in the world of research and clinical care related to multiple myeloma,” said Dr. Paul Lee, the president of CBHI. “While we have had amazing recovery cases of patients with multiple myeloma undergoing SAC therapy, the collaborative research will help us to gain a deeper understanding of the healing pathways of SAC for multiple myeloma and erythropoietin-induced osteoporosis.”

Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematological malignancy. It mostly occurs at older ages and remains an incurable disease. It is a B cell cancer mainly characterized by the proliferation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow, the presence of monoclonal serum immunoglobulin, and osteolytic lesions. Multiple myeloma is highly associated with bone destruction, where osteoclasts are more active than osteoblasts. Studies have found that myeloma progresses with osteoclast induced bone resorption while osteoblast enhanced bone formation inhibits the progression. This evidence indicates that SAC's effect on regulating the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts poses itself as a good candidate for myeloma therapy.

SAC (Sigma Anti-Bonding Calcium) calcium was invented by Dr. Paul Lee of CBHI in 2009. Utilizing unstable sigma-antibonding in calcium carbonate molecules, SAC readily releases calcium to be absorbed directly in ionic form without the help of vitamin D and peptides. A small amount of this physiologically active form of calcium triggers hormonal responses to restore calcium homeostasis, a crucial balance responsible for healthy mitochondrial function and correct cellular signaling in activating natural healing mechanisms. SAC's healing pathways are natural without side effects.

This two-year collaborative research focuses on pharmacokinetics study of SAC, biological safety of SAC, and in vivo effects of SAC in multiple myeloma and erythropoietin-induced osteoporosis.

About CBHI
Calcium and Bone Health Institute (CBHI) is a nonprofit scientific research organization based in Canada. With the invention of novel SAC ionic calcium carbonate, its primary research focuses on the role of ionic calcium in treating over 150 calcium-related chronic degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis, Alzheimer's, metabolic diseases, etc. By conducting laboratory and clinical research, CBHI endeavors to find effective prevention and treatment methods. CBHI collaborates with many other research centers such as SFU, UBC, UC Davis, NSERC Canada, and BC Government to combine the research with fundamental sciences such as mathematics, chemistry, physics, and biology. It held the first International Sigma Anti-Bonding Calcium Symposium (ISACS) 2019 in Vancouver, Canada to discuss and share the knowledge of the various measures to develop healthy bone and to prevent calcium-related diseases. This year, CBHI plans to hold ISACS in Manila, Philippines, which is not confirmed yet due to COVID-19 pandemic.

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Alex Lee
CBHI
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