Bread of Hope Launches Box of Hope Campaign to Help Crisis in Venezuela

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Bread of Hope, a non-profit organization based in Alpharetta Georgia, has recently started a campaign to help the impoverished Wayuu population in Northern Venezuela. The campaign, called Box of Hope, sends donated boxes of non-perishable foods, toiletries and school supplies to aid those currently suffering from an economic and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela.

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We are eager to witness the impact that the Box of Hope campaign has on the Wayuu population. These are people who have a desperate need for basic physical resources as well as a personal yearning for hope, says Hebert Rincon, Bread of Hope Director.

Bread of Hope is a non-profit organization that is driven by a passion to help the Wayuu people living in the arid Guajira Peninsula in northern Colombia and northwest Venezuela. According to Venezuelan congresswoman Karin Salanova, 28 children die each day right now in Venezuela due to hunger or lack of medicine. Recently, Bread of Hope has launched a Box of Hope campaign to address the current economic and humanitarian crisis that is dramatically affecting the Wayuu population in Venezuela.

According to several articles published on the Human Rights Watch website including a recent October 2016 Article, Venezuela is experiencing a profound humanitarian crisis. Venezuelan citizens have very limited access to basic food, medicine and hygiene products. Without imported goods, scarcity on Venezuela store shelves has left many families surviving on just one meal per day. Life for the Wayuu people is one that is centered on garbage, as they find it necessary to collect and sell trash as well as search for food in dumpsters. Bread of Hope was established to not only raise awareness of this destitute population, but to also create strategies to provide resources to them. By connecting with local churches in Venezuela, Bread of Hope intends to address both the physical and spiritual needs of Wayuu families.

Anyone is welcome to participate and support the Box of Hope campaign. It involves using participants’ donations to fill boxes of non-perishable food, personal hygiene products, medicines and school supplies. The boxes, measuring 16” x 12” x 12” each, are delivered to local churches in Venezuela and distributed to families in need.

“We are eager to witness the impact that the Box of Hope campaign has on the Wayuu population. These are people who have a desperate need for basic physical resources as well as a personal yearning for hope,” says Hebert Rincon, Bread of Hope Director of Operations.

For a $150 donation, a pre-packed box is sent in the supporter’s name and delivered directly to families in need. The person or organization donating a box or boxes will receive a photo of the family receiving the box with the donor’s name printed on the box. One donated box will feed a family for one month. Box of Hope donations can easily be sent online at http://www.breadofhope.com/boxofhope.

About Bread of Hope:

Bread of Hope is a faith-based, non-profit organization located at 292 South Main Street in Alpharetta, GA 30009. Bread of Hope was created to help the Wayuu population who are undergoing great scarcity. The organization is driven by a “value exchange” concept. In doing so, Bread of Hope has launched several campaigns and initiatives to give others the opportunity to be the value exchange for the Wayuu people, including hosting fundraisers, sending a box, past trips to the Venezuela region or participating in Trash to Treasure, which involves hosting a local garage sale and sending the proceeds to support the Wayuu people. Bread of Hope also empowers native churches in Venezuela and Colombia with the resources needed to exchange hopelessness for their personal spiritual value.

For more information about Bread of Hope or the Box of Hope campaign, please visit breadofhope.com or call the Alpharetta office directly at (678) 343-5545.

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Hebert Rincon