Lean On Life Supports New Research That Reveals the Dangers of Washing Raw Chicken

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Lean On Life, a leading healthy lifestyle website with the latest on weight loss, nutrition, and fitness is supporting research revealing common kitchen practice, such as rinsing raw chicken, that can leave contamination.

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Lean On Life Supports New Research That Reveals the Dangers of Washing Raw Chicken

Do Not Wash Your Chicken!

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Lean On Life, a leading healthy lifestyle website with the latest on weight loss, nutrition, and fitness is supporting research revealing common kitchen practice, such as rinsing raw chicken, that can leave contamination.

As Lean On Life reports (http://www.leanonlife.com/10-healthy-food-practices-that-could-make-you-sick/), according to food safety researcher, Jennifer Quinlan, an associate professor at Drexel University, washing raw chicken before cooking can lead to more contamination in the kitchen. She has recently started a “Do Not Wash Your Chicken!” campaign (http://www.drexel.edu/dontwashyourchicken/).

To get a lead on killing bacteria, many people wash their raw poultry to prepare it for cutting and cooking. However, Quilan explains that the washing process actually sprays the bacteria all over the kitchen and increases the chance of cross contamination. Not only that, but the water most people rinse their raw poultry in is likely not even hot enough to kill the bacteria, leaving chicken-eaters susceptible to Salmonella.

Lean On Life Chef, Tal Brodsky, advises to cook poultry at a temperature over 165 degrees Fahrenheit to kill off all traces of Salmonella in the meat without having to wash it first.

Other common food practices that may cause illness, food poisoning, or an upset stomach due to bacteria include eating spoiled leftovers. It is recommended to refrigerate all food once cooled and within 2 hours of cooking. And not to leave it in the fridge for more than four days as this will increase risk of growing high levels of bacteria.

Moreover, by eating undercooked meat, poultry, seafood and eggs, people may ingest harmful bacteria that can make them sick. According to the U.S. Department of Food and Agriculture, people should cook meat and pork to 160 degrees Fahrenheit, poultry to 165 degrees Fahrenheit, fish to 145 degrees Fahrenheit and leftovers to 165 degrees Fahrenheit. Eggs are done when the whites and the yolk are firm.

Tal Brodsky also recommends not re-using the same plate or dish that held raw meats without thoroughly cleaning the plate before placing cooked foods.

Lean On Life is a healthy lifestyle website that provides expert-driven knowledge from doctors, nutritionists, fitness trainers and life coaches. The site takes a hands-on approach to making weight-loss, healthy eating and fitness a simple achievable lifestyle change.

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Tal Brodsky
Lean On Life
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