1 in 10 Americans Believe Their Personal Accounts May Have Been “Hacked” By Someone Who Shares Their Streaming Subscriptions

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New survey finds that a worrying percentage of people use the same password for personal accounts as they do for shared streaming accounts

Fifty-two percent of people who have shared a streaming password say that the shared password is the same or similar to the passwords they use for their personal accounts.

PasswordManager.com, a group of experts, researchers, and analysts who are committed to ensuring the internet safety of all consumers, recently released its findings from a survey of 1,250 Americans. Survey participants were asked a variety of questions about their password-sharing habits and safety practices when it comes to streaming subscriptions and sensitive personal accounts such as online banking and email.

The results showed a startling lack of password safety among the 48% of Americans who say they share their streaming passwords with other people. While the majority of this group say they share with just one or two other people, some respondents revealed that they’ve shared their password with as many as five or six others. Concerningly, 26% of respondents in this group say that someone they’ve shared their streaming password with has given it to someone else without their permission.

Fifty-two percent of people who have shared a streaming password say that the shared password is the same or similar to the passwords they use for their personal accounts. Of these 52%, 78% say they use the same password for their social media accounts, 56% use the same password for their email, and 42% use the same password for their online banking.

Fifty-one percent of those who have shared a streaming password say they ‘strongly’ (24%) or ‘somewhat’ (27%) believe that one or more of their private accounts have been hacked. Of this group, half also ‘strongly’ (26%) or ‘somewhat’ (24%) believe that their private accounts were actually “hacked” by someone they shared a streaming password with.

In addition to password sharing and safety, the survey also asked participants about their thoughts on Netflix’s plans to crack down on password sharing in 2023. According to the survey results, the most commonly-shared streaming service password by far is for Netflix. Sixty-eight percent of those who have shared a streaming password say they pay for a Netflix account, while 26% say they use someone else’s account.

Among these Netflix users, 70% say they are ‘very’ (35%) or ‘somewhat’ (35%) upset by Netflix’s plan to crack down on password sharing in 2023. Twenty-three percent of those who pay for a Netflix account say they will cancel their account once they can no longer share their password with others, while 22% say they are willing to pay for additional accounts.

For the full survey results, please visit PasswordManager.com at: https://www.passwordmanager.com/1-in-10-believe-their-bank-accounts-have-been-hacked-by-a-netflix-password-mooch/.

ABOUT PASSWORDMANAGER.COM
In order to provide consumers with the information they need to protect their online accounts and information, we take a fact-based, data-backed approach, including insights from industry experts. We survey account holders — those who have had their accounts compromised and those who are already taking the necessary precautions to keep their accounts safe — to identify and understand the problems consumers are facing and provide trusted solutions. To learn more, visit https://www.passwordmanager.com/.

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Heidi Thiel
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