Cashless Society? Not During National Coin Week, Declares American Numismatic Association

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The 95th annual National Coin Week, April 15-21, 2018, reminds everyone that money is history you can hold in your hands.

National Coin Week calls attention to the history and cultural significance of money. This 1793 U.S. cent has 15 rings to symbolize unity of the 15 states at that time. Photo credit: www.NGCcoin.com

The designs, denominations and metallic content of coins tell us a great deal about civilizations, past and present, such as famous and not-so-famous political and historical figures, important events and landmarks.

Every coin or piece of paper money in your pocket, purse, piggy bank or sock drawer not only has a story to tell about people, places and events, it has its own special week.

The 95th annual National Coin Week (http://www.NationalCoinWeek.org), April 15-21, 2018, is sponsored by the nonprofit American Numismatic Association (http://www.money.org) to celebrate the historical, cultural, artistic and economic importance of money as well as the enjoyment of coin and paper money collecting.

“The designs, denominations and metallic content of coins tell us a great deal about civilizations, past and present, such as famous and not-so-famous political and historical figures, important events and landmarks,” explained Gary Adkins, president of the Colorado Springs, Colorado-based American Numismatic Association.

National Coin Week Coordinator Andy Dickes concurred. “Coins have been around for about 2,600 years, and despite the increase in non-cash transactions and digital currency there is still a strong demand for cash. In 2017, the United States Mint struck more than 14 billion coins and the U.S. Treasury Department’s Bureau of Engraving and Printing produced more than 7 billion pieces of paper money during its fiscal year 2017,” he said.

The theme of this year’s National Coin Week is “Connecting Cultures: From Many, One.” The American Numismatic Association along with hundreds of local coin clubs and individual collectors will be setting up exhibits across the country to share the role of numismatics in building bridges between people and promoting unity and reconciliation.

“Symbolism is often an important part of designs on coins and currency,” said Dickes who is Collection Manager at the American Numismatic Association Money Museum in Colorado Springs. “For example, the first coins struck for circulation at the United States Mint in 1793 were large copper pennies about the size of today’s quarter-dollars, and the tail’s side design on those cents depicted a chain with 15 links forming a circle. It symbolized the unity of the 15 states at that time.”

For additional information about National Coin Week, visit http://www.NationalCoinWeek.org.

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