2018-19 Calendar from SPIE Showcases STEM Women from Across the Globe

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SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, publishes its 15th annual desk planner featuring women across multiple scientific arenas, this time encompassing the academic year

FUTURE VISION: The 2019 SPIE Women in Optics Planner

Vinita Madill, space operations engineer, European Space Agency. Martha Sanchez, senior scientist, IBM Research. Jacklyn Novak, infrared materials engineer, LightPath Technologies. In the future, these names may be as recognized as that of Katherine Johnson, the NASA mathematician who just celebrated her 100th birthday. Today, they are among 26 scientists whose work and words are showcased in the annual calendar from SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics.

VPs of strategy and innovation, company directors, and business development managers share the pages with professors, research scientists, engineers, and PhD students, representing a rich range of organizations including the SETI Institute, the Research Institutes of Sweden, the French National Center for Scientific Research and ICube Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital’s Wellman Center for Photomedicine, California Institute of Technology’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Intel, Australia’s University of New South Wales, and Mexico’s Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica Óptica y Electrónica.

The scientists’ profiles include insight into their professions and career trajectories, their challenges and successes. Each one is a dynamic role model for other women and girls interested in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) fields; together they serve as exciting examples of the myriad opportunities available in STEM professions. “I am a research scientist in biophotonics leading a group that develops novel microscopy/spectroscopy tools for early and objective cancer diagnosis,” writes Anna Chiara De Luca of the National Research Council of Italy’s Institute of Protein Biochemistry. “Our aim is to image living cells and understand their molecular changes in pathological conditions using light. I mentor students, recruit members, develop research ideas, analyze data and discuss results, exchange ideas with people all over the world, and write papers and grant proposals to support our research. I also teach undergraduate and graduate courses, and conduct outreach activities to promote photonics to younger students.”

The engaging and informative SPIE Women in Optics Planner is for science teachers, educators, career counselors, community clubs, students, and the general public. To request a free copy while supplies last, visit the SPIE website.

About SPIE

SPIE is the international society for optics and photonics, an educational not-for-profit organization founded in 1955 to advance light-based science, engineering, and technology. The Society serves nearly 264,000 constituents from approximately 166 countries, offering conferences and their published proceedings, continuing education, books, journals, and the SPIE Digital Library. In 2017, SPIE provided more than $4 million in support of education and outreach programs. http://www.spie.org.

Contact:
Daneet Steffens
Public Relations Manager
daneets(at)spie(dot)org
+1 360 685 5478
@SPIEtweets

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Daneet Steffens
SPIE
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