Allergy Partners Discusses Ways to Differentiate Between Cold, the Flu, or COVID-19

Share Article

In the best of times, it can be hard to tell the difference between symptoms of a cold and the flu. With the COVID-19 pandemic, understanding what these symptoms are versus those of COVID-19 is even more important than ever.

Comparing the symptoms of COVID-19, Asthma and Allergies

Comparing the symptoms of COVID-19, Asthma and Allergies

Here is how you can tell the difference
In the best of times, it can be hard to tell the difference between symptoms of a cold and the flu. With the COVID-19 pandemic, understanding what these symptoms are versus those of COVID-19 is even more important than ever.

Facts
The virus causing COVID-19, called SARS-CoV-2, is part of a family of viruses called Coronaviruses. This is a large family of viruses that cause illnesses ranging from the common cold to more severe respiratory illnesses. Coronaviruses can develop in animals and, through mutation, come to infect humans. SARS-CoV-19 is a mutated coronavirus that emerged in China in late 2019. It can cause severe respiratory illnesses such as pneumonia and can be fatal. Yet, in some people the symptoms can be mild. You should seek immediate medical care for any of the following:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

Because cold and flu symptoms can appear like some of the symptoms of COVID-19, it is very important to monitor your symptoms closely. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has an interactive symptom tracker you can use to determine if you should seek care for possible COVID-19 infection at: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.

  • Avoid large crowds, especially in indoor spaces
  • Wear a face covering at all times
  • Practice social distancing
  • Avoid touching your face and eyes
  • Wash or sanitize your hands frequently

Most importantly, keep in contact with your Allergy Partners physician. Our offices remain open and we are offering Telemedicine services to make sure you and your family remain well during this challenging time. Our experienced allergists are anxious to discuss any questions or concerns you may have about COVID-19 and how we can best manage your health together.

WILLIAM A. MCCANN, M.D.
Born and raised outside of Baltimore, Dr. McCann has called North Carolina home since completing medical school. After his pediatrics training at Duke, he practiced general pediatrics for three years in Hendersonville. During this time, he realized that his passion lies in the treatment of allergies and asthma. After a brief sojourn in Augusta, Georgia for allergy and immunology training, he returned to Western North Carolina and joined Allergy Partners.

RICHARD L. WASSERMAN, M.D., PHD.
Dr. Wasserman received his medical degree from the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine/University of Texas Southwestern Medical School and completed his Pediatrics Residency at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr. Wasserman completed fellowship training in Bone Marrow transplantation/Immunology at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Postdoctoral Cancer/Immunology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, and Immunology/Rheumatology at The Rockefeller University.

Allergy Partners, PLLC is the nation's largest single specialty practice with multiple locations across the United States. Our allergists provide evaluation and treatment of following conditions:

Allergic Rhinitis | Asthma | Food Allergies | Eczema Hives | Sinus Problems | Stinging Insect Allergies | Immune Deficiencies | Chronic Cough | Drug Allergies Recurrent Infections | Eosinophilic Esophagitis

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

William A. McCann M.D. & Richard L. Wasserman M.D.
Visit website