Discover how one woman helped incarcerated women through sewing in ‘Jail Journal’

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Nancie Wiseman Attwater discusses sewing’s soothing and self-esteem boosting effect

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Nancie Wiseman Attwater shares the lessons she learned while teaching sewing at a county jail to gang members, murderers, shoplifters, detainees of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and others in her new book, “Jail Journal: Sewing Behind Bars” (published by Archway Publishing).

While this is a book about sewing, it is also about the lives of women who have been torn apart by using drugs and getting involved in crime. Many of the women Attwater taught were ICE detainees for the federal government. Coming from every country one can think of, they added to the stories with their own heartbreaking sagas of living in the U.S. undocumented. Attwater also taught the county inmates with various charges from shop lifting to murder.

The author hopes that her book gives readers “A sense that we are all here together. Human beings in tough situations should not be judged because of being incarcerated. Whether their bad decision was based on their own poor judgement or someone else’s the stories are compelling. Despite harsh conditions and unusual rules, that were frequently changed, the experience was a wonderful opportunity to help other women in a place few people will ever see. The women were warm and friendly and always helpful. Their lives were made just a little brighter with a hug or a gentle pat on the back along with their sewing lesson.”

Attwater’s book “Jail Journal” is available to purchase online on Amazon at: https://www.amazon.com/Jail-Journal-Sewing-Behind-Bars/dp/1480882860.

“Jail Journal”
By Nancie Wiseman Attwater
Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 210 pages | ISBN 9781480882843
Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 210 pages | ISBN 9781480882867
E-Book | 210 pages | ISBN 9781480882850
Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble

About the Author
Nancie Wiseman Attwater is a nationally-known needlework teacher and author of twelve books on knitting, crochet, and quilting. She taught sewing for eight years to the women in a county jail. Her unique gift of sharing herself with her students while she teaches the joy of sewing and needle arts brought many joyful days to the women in an otherwise dreary jail situation. A former registered nurse, she also offers a perspective on the drugs many of the women used and their related problems.

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