Discover Treasures of Ancient Greece and Explore the Modern Culture of Greece Through Take Me There: Greece

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Most everything we know today has it’s roots in Ancient Greece... western democracy, architecture, science, myth, legends and the Olympics. See fascinating artifacts, some of which have never been on American soil and learn about modern day Greece in two separate exhibits at The Children's Museum of Indianapolis.

Artemis is one of 150 artifacts showcased in Treasures of Ancient Greece at The Children's Museum of Indianapolis.

Artemis, goddess of the hunt, is one of the most complete marbles on display and an excellent example of Greek art on display at The Children's Museum of Indianapolis.

Marble, bronze and other amazing antiquities from 2,000 years ago tell the story of ancient Greece in one exhibit while the other takes visitors to modern-day Greece to experience today's culture in immersive hands-on experience.

The “land of the gods” travels 5,300 miles to the world’s largest children’s museum when Treasures of Ancient Greece and Take Me There:® Greece both opened on June 15, 2019.

Treasures of Ancient Greece presented by OneAmerica and supported by Ice Miller LLP

Every one of the 6,000 Greek islands has secrets, mysteries and treasures from the past. Visitors to The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis will discover some of the most compelling stories at a new exhibit featuring rare Greek antiquities, some of which are being exhibited for the first time in the United States. Families will learn about ancient ruins, temples and open air theaters along with philosophers and mythological gods.

Visitors to Treasures of Ancient Greece at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis will discover how the ideas of the ancient Greeks form the basis of much of Western civilization as we know it today through artifacts that depict ingenious science and technology, politics and medicine.

One of the extraordinary stories that will be told is that of the famed Antikythera Mechanism. “We are very excited to share a model of what is believed to be the world’s oldest analog computer,” said Dr. Jeffrey H. Patchen, president and CEO, The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. “It will help families understand how a civilization from long ago predicted eclipses of the sun and moon in relation to big events like the ancient Olympics.” That’s not the only piece of history that links the United States to this Mediterranean country from centuries ago. Bronze ballots and a replica voting machine are just a few of the artifacts that demonstrate how the world’s first democracy shaped the politics of today.

“It was found by divers in the beginning of the 20th century close to the island of Antikythera after being excavated by Jacques Cousteau and the Greek Ecological Service. Even today we have excavations in the same area of the shipwreck of the Antikythera because it was found in the shipwreck with other objects and with many statues. We’re waiting for more results about this shipwreck and what was together with the Antikythera mechanism,” said Dr. Maria Vlazaki, Secretary General, Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sport.

The ancient Greek vision of beauty, heroism, and athleticism also influences us today through magnificent sculptures on display including Artemis of Lafria and Herakles. A stunning bust of Aristotle is also be on display along with an amazing large mosaic and pottery depicting gods, goddesses and philosophers, along with a replica of Parthenon frieze sections. Actor interpreters help bring these fascinating artifacts and their stories to life.

Ancient Greek heroes and heroines brought great pride and honor to their cities through the athletic competition of the Olympic Games. Visitors can test their own speed in a virtual Olympic running event. There is a chance to vote in an Athenian Assembly, create mosaic artwork, and tell an ancient Greek story by creating their own visual story on a special vase. Visitors can also help Aphrodite and Eros escape a monster Typhon.

Take Me There®: Greece Presented by Ice Miller LLP
Take Me There: ® Greece serves as a classic travel adventure allowing families to explore modern-day Greece without ever leaving the United States. It is one of the largest exhibitions on contemporary Greece ever mounted in the United States.

Visitors “fly over” magnificent mountains and swirling seas before “touching down” in Athens, where the ancient Parthenon overlooks a bustling modern city. Families have the opportunity to explore homes and learn about real families who live in Greece.

Children will be invited to make traditional Greek foods and serve their grownups faux Greek delicacies in the recreated Taverna and bakery, and stroll through plateia (plaza) with its traditional events. Families will enjoy exploring traditional dance and music together and shopping in the market with its fresh fruits, vegetables, and fish.
With 8,000 miles of coastline, Greek conservation organizations have a lot of sea turtles to study. Visitors will learn how they are doing this and how they can help.

Treasures of Ancient Greece is made possible by the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation, Inc.; The Nicholas H. Noyes, Jr., Memorial Foundation; Dorothea and Philip Genetos; Jamie Merisotis and Colleen O’Brien; Mike and Kristin Sherman; and The Pheffer Family.

Take Me There: ® Greece is made possible by lead gifts from Lilly Endowment Inc.; Eli Lilly and Company Foundation, Inc.; The Lilly Family; Mrs. Yvonne Shaheen; Sarah and John Lechleiter; the U.S. Institute for Museum and Library Services; Jane and Steve Marmon; Susan and Jim Naus; and Polly Hix. Additional Support for Take Me There®: Greece is provided by the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation, Inc.; The Nicholas H. Noyes, Jr., Memorial Foundation; Dorothea and Philip Genetos; Jamie Merisotis and Colleen O’Brien; Mike and Kristin Sherman; and The Pheffer Family.

About The Children's Museum of Indianapolis
The Children's Museum of Indianapolis is a nonprofit institution committed to creating extraordinary learning experiences across the arts, sciences, and humanities that have the power to transform the lives of children and families. For more information about The Children's Museum, visit http://www.childrensmuseum.org, follow us on Twitter @TCMIndy, Instagram@childrensmuseum, YouTube.com/IndyTCM, and Facebook.

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