Food Equality Initiative, FEI presents For the Health™: A Conversation on Race & Food Allergy, featuring a panel of food Industry Experts

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“For the Health™ is a webinar series creating a dialogue on racial and economic disparities in food allergy. It is my hope that words will move to action, and we will see real lasting change.” - Emily Brown, CEO. Panelists will discuss what Industry Experts can do to end racial disparities in food allergy.

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“For the Health™ is a webinar series creating a dialogue on racial and economic disparities in food allergy. It is my hope that words will move to action, and we will see real lasting change.” Emily Brown, CEO.

Food Equality Initiative (FEI), a nonprofit with the mission to improve health and end hunger in individuals diagnosed with food allergies and celiac disease announced the third of the “For the Health” webinar series, A Conversation on Race & Food Allergy.

The webinar will be moderated by Karen Palmer of Karen Palmer Coaching. She is a Certified Professional Coach, school operations consultant, and an advocate for food allergy families.

This webinar will focus on institutional change. The panelists will center the conversation on equitable access to safe food in food allergy management and will focus on:

  • Food insecurity and race
  • SDoH, health equity and food allergy
  • Food and nutrition program policy
  • 2020 Dietary Guidelines
  • Precautionary Allergen Labeling (PAL)
  • Food as medicine

The expert panelists include industry leaders:

This free webinar is Friday, September 18, 2020, 10 am CT / 11am ET.
Register to attend at “The For the Health™

The “The For the Health™ webinar series was inspired by this Open Letter to the Food Allergy Community written by Emily Brown, CEO of Food Equality Initiative, after the murder of George Floyd that has focused the nation's attention on the public health crisis of police brutality, which targets black men and women.

Emily Brown says this, “For the Health™ webinar series is creating a dialogue on racial and economic disparities in food allergy. It is my hope that words will move to action, and we will see real lasting change.”

Research shows that Black children are 7% more likely to have food allergies compared to white children, are diagnosed less frequently, receive less medical care, and are more likely to experience anaphylaxis. Learn more about this and how you can help at Food Equality Initiative.

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