HFA Explores How To Bridge the Design Gap for Successful Industrialized Construction

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"Bridging the Gap: Balancing Design and Industrialized Construction", a white paper published by HFA, examines the current state of Industrialized Construction, its impact on stakeholders' jobs, and how it can be successfully implemented to dramatically increase construction speed and quality.

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Download the Industrialized Construction White Paper from HFA

Any project can be constructed using flat-pack or wall panelization, for instance, and building owners are coming to understand that. If you start with a vision for the building first, there are very few limitations that Industrialized Construction brings to the process.

HFA (Harrison French & Associates, LTD), an architecture and engineering firm, recently published a white paper examining the current state of Industrialized Construction, its impact on stakeholders' jobs, and how it can be successfully implemented to increase construction speed and quality dramatically. “Bridging the Gap: Balancing Design and Industrialized Construction" takes a closer look at how Industrialized Construction, while not a new development, can fit to scale for a variety of projects without losing ever-important design aesthetics.

“In a fledgling industry, it is easy to see the obvious potential and to identify the known-unknowns. What is more valuable is to discover through doing what the unknown unknowns are: what new problems you never expected must be addressed? At HFA, our experience in various scales of Industrialized Construction projects has helped us understand the most urgent problems Industrialized Construction needs to solve. And so aside from the goals above, our aim with this white paper is to help readers understand that, although many questions are still unanswered when it comes to Industrialized Construction, the answers are beginning to emerge.”

A sticking point for many clients is the notion that Industrialized Construction projects must be lacking in design. This is certainly not the case, both in the experience of HFA and others working with Industrialized Construction projects.
“Any project can be constructed using flat-pack or wall panelization, for instance, and building owners are coming to understand that. If you start with a vision for the building first, there are very few limitations that Industrialized Construction brings to the process. The only fundamental limitation of Industrialized Construction is based on shipping capability. Any project can be modularized, so long as the resulting modular components can still be shipped to the construction site.”

The team concludes with, “It is not far-fetched to picture a future in which buildings can be designed and ordered from a manufacturer who can slot the project into their continuous assembly-line with few changes.”

At HFA, our experience with the Industrialized Construction process of deploying both pilot and nationwide Industrialized Construction projects, we understand the unique interplay of design and manufacturing is critical for success. Designers and manufacturers must work closely together to make Industrialized projects work and achieve added value while also delivering on their project's requirements. Our work in Industrialized Construction with our current clients has shown us where technology and application gaps exist, allowing us to provide much-needed information and advice to colleagues within the industry interested in exploring Industrialized Construction projects in the future.

HFA is committed to providing informed analysis and real-world case studies within the architecture and engineering industry. As part of that commitment, HFA formed a group called Project Curiosity to share industry knowledge with owners, designers, manufacturers, contractors, and other stakeholders.

To read more from our Project Curiosity team and the white paper in its entirety, click here: https://blog.hfa-ae.com/posts/project-curiosity-white-paper-industrialized-construction

Contact us today to learn more about how our team of architects and engineers can help you and your clients with your next project.

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About HFA
Founded in 1990, HFA is a full-service Architecture and Engineering firm with locations in Bentonville, AR; Franklin, MA; Fort Worth, TX; and Mexico City, MX. Focused on designing for the customer experience, HFA works coast to coast with retail, real estate development, office, industrial, fueling, restaurant/food service, lifestyle, and education clients.

Contact: Daryl Whitmer, Director of Marketing and Business Development, (479) 273−7780 ext. 274 or daryl.whitmer@hfa−ae.com.

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Daryl Whitmer
HFA
+1 4792737780 Ext: 274
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Daryl Whitmer
HFA
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