Increasing Connection Between Poor Oral Health and Harmful Conditions Like Psoriasis Highlights Need for Good Dental Routine, says Dr. Sahar Verdi

Share Article

Dr. Verdi of Thousand Oaks-based dental center Dental Specialists of California comments on a recent article that the simple act of brushing teeth can have a significant impact on an individual’s health and well-being.

The dental office is based in Thousand Oaks, California.

While it may still be too early to definitively say that poor oral health directly causes psoriasis, there are still many established links between unhealthy teeth and gums and other adverse conditions such as heart disease.

An October 13 article on WMC 5 Action News reports on a potential link between poor oral health and psoriatic arthritis. The exact nature of this link is still being determined but may involve bacterial infections in the mouth and the subsequent response from the body’s immune system. According to the hypothesis laid out by researchers, the body’s immune response to the bacterial infection may somehow be targeting the patient’s skin as well, causing the characteristic swelling and inflammation associated with psoriasis. Board-certified periodontist Dr. Sahar Verdi of Dental Specialists of California says that while it may still be too early to definitively say that poor oral health directly causes psoriasis, there are still many established links between unhealthy teeth and gums and other adverse conditions such as heart disease.

The Thousand Oaks-based periodontist notes that if individuals need any more convincing that their after-meal brushing routine makes a difference, this is it. Dr. Verdi says with the proven connections between poor oral health and deteriorating vitality in other areas of the body, daily dental care and maintenance should be taken very seriously.

People should be brushing their teeth for two minutes, roughly 30 minutes after every meal, she adds. Dr. Verdi notes that the first figure ensures a complete cleaning while the second figure provides ample time for tooth enamel to re-mineralize and harden after eating. Dr. Verdi says that while it may sound counterintuitive, brushing immediately after eating or drinking sugary or acidic foods could actually damage just-softened tooth enamel. The board-certified periodontist adds that stripped and weakened teeth are more vulnerable to tooth decay and may lead to diseases of the gums. If left unchecked, these oral ailments may increase the chances of individuals suffering other harmful conditions like stroke.

Dr. Verdi says even the increased chance of having to deal with something so serious should be enough to warn patients about the dangers of poor dental hygiene. The notes that patients who regularly brush and floss are significantly less likely to experience discolored or stained teeth, and that the prospects of breaking or cracking a tooth are also notably lesser.

Interested readers can learn more about Dr. Verdi and Dental Specialists of California by visiting the center’s website at https://dentalspecialistsofca.com/ or by calling (805) 370-7171.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Dr. Sahar Verdi
Visit website