Moderna COVID-19 vaccine causes inflammation and swelling in patients who have had aesthetic facial fillers.

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Charles E. Crutchfield III, M.D. of Crutchfield Dermatology, in Eagan, Minnesota states that the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine causes inflammation and swelling in some patients who have had aesthetic facial fillers.

Charles E. Crutchfield III, M.D.

After the Moderna vaccine, some patients developed swelling and inflammation at the sites where the skin filler was administered. The good news is that all the affected patients were treated and the condition resolved.

Charles E. Crutchfield III, M.D. of Crutchfield Dermatology, states that the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine causes inflammation and swelling in some patients who have had aesthetic facial fillers.

The FDA advisory committee noted that a rare and specific side effect of facial swelling was observed in patients reviewing the new Moderna vaccine with a history of receiving cosmetic facial fillers.
https://www.drugdiscoverytrends.com/moderna-covid-19-vaccine-might-cause-facial-swelling-for-people-with-dermal-fillers/

Board-certified dermatologist Dr. Crutchfield explains what the FDA committee reported in the hyaluronic acid-based skin fillers.

"In the specific cases, the patients had swelling and inflammation at the sites where the skin filler was administered. Some of the patients had the filler a year or more before the vaccine, and others had the filler a few days after receiving the vaccine.
"The good news is that all the affected patients were treated with prescription-strength anti-inflammatories and anti-histamines, and they all resolved." Dr. Crutchfield said.

"Millions of people around the world have received prescription facial fillers to improve the appearance of wrinkles and fine lines and also to enhance other facial areas such as lips, cheeks, and noses. Because the hyaluronic acid-based fillers so closely resemble the hyaluronic acid naturally occurring in the body and skin, it is a bit perplexing as to why it would cause a reaction. Perhaps the key is to the extraordinarily subtle differences in formulation and structure. Still, it should be noted that we have never required allergy testing before administering hyaluronic-based fillers," Dr. Crutchfield reports.

The bottom line is that if you have had fillers or are planning on getting fillers in the future, you may wish to see if you have an option to get the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. Never-the-less, do not let it stop you from getting vaccinated.

In the tiny percentage of patients who do have this rare reaction (probably less than 1% of people who had hyaluronic acid-based fillers), it is well known that these patients are all easily treated and that their adverse reactions all resolved.

About Charles E. Crutchfield III, M.D:
Charles E. Crutchfield III, M.D., is a graduate of the Mayo Clinic Medical School and a Clinical Professor of Dermatology at the University of Minnesota Medical School. He is currently the Medical Director of Crutchfield Dermatology in Eagan and is a Benedict Distinguished Professor of Biology at Carleton College. Dr. Crutchfield has won numerous teaching and professional awards and is the co-author of a children's book on sun protection, a dermatology textbook, and hundreds of medial articles. He is a member of the AΩA National Medical Honor Society, an expert consultant for WebMD and CNN, and a recipient of the Karis Humanitarian Award from the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine. He is the team physician for the Minnesota Twins, Vikings, Wild, Timberwolves and Lynx professional sports teams. Dr. Crutchfield has over 25 years of clinical experience caring for patients.

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Kelly McGuire
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