My Plates Great Plate Auction showcases rare Texas license plate numbers

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My Plates, the official vendor for specialty license plates in Texas, is auctioning 50 unique license plate messages including a limited release of eight rare, low-license-plate numbers for sale in the auction that runs through November 17, 2021.

8 rare Texas number plates for sale

Low numbers hold a special place in Texas’ license plate story, and this auction will give Texans the opportunity to own a rare piece of history,” said Steve Farrar, President of My Plates

My Plates, the official vendor for specialty license plates in Texas, is auctioning a limited release of historic license plate numbers as part of their Great Plate Auction. My Plates will be offering eight rare, low-license-plate numbers for sale in the auction that runs through November 17, 2021.

These eight rare Texas plate numbers range from a low of 27 to a high of 2022. Perhaps you wore 27 as a sports jersey or you’re from the 27th state, Florida? It could be you wish to begin celebrating 2022 already, and who can blame you? For these or other reasons you decide, you can bid on one of these great plate messages starting today!

Other unique numbers include 75, 250 and the repeating number 333. If you’re into directions, then possibly 180 or 360 are more in your lane?

“Low numbers hold a special place in Texas’ license plate story, and this auction will give Texans the opportunity to own a rare piece of history,” said Steve Farrar, President of My Plates.

Not into numbers? No worries, as My Plates has forty-two other great plate messages to bid on, from Texas themes, sports and even rare 2-character messages.

Looking for something car related? Try CUSTOM, RARE or BUICK, and for Volkswagen owners there’s two special options, LOVEBUG and VW.

College more your thing? The auction is showcasing some great university-themed messages including GIGGEM, OU, LNGHRN, BU and FROGZ.

Unlike other everyday Texas license plates, plate messages sold at auction by My Plates are legally transferable. This means the plate owner has the right to pass it on to a family member, or gift to a friend. Transferability also means these plates can be sold, and therefore could make great investments. Any future recipient also gets the same ongoing transfer rights.

Each plate message offered in this auction is for an initial 5-year term and have an opening bid of only $500, with only a few with a reserve above that price. Hence, on most plate messages, an opening bid could be the winning bid for that lot if no other bids are received.

“There are a lot of unique, clever, fun and interesting plate messages available, and through the auction, Texans have an opportunity to secure one,” said Steve Farrar.

The My Plates Great Plate Auction is online-only and may be accessed via http://www.myplates.com/auction. Registering is quick and easy and once completed, you’ll be able to bid on your desired plate message.

Auction Details:

  • Dates: On now until November 17, 2021.
  • Online auction accessed via http://www.myplates.com/auction.
  • All bidders must be registered to place a bid.
  • People interested in the auction can visit http://www.myplates.com/auction for more information, to register and to view the complete list of plate messages for sale.
  • Winners get to place the plate message on any of the 100+ eligible My Plates Select designs.

Current top ten high bids as at November 15, 4pm CST.

  • SMILE – $3,200
  • 27 – $3,100
  • AAA – $2,200
  • EPIC – $2,000
  • BU – $1,600
  • RARE – $1,500
  • 75 – $1,500
  • WWWW – $1,200
  • GIGGEM – $1,200
  • LNGHRN – $1,200

Previous Auction Results:

  • 12THMAN sold for $115,000 in September 2013, making it the most expensive plate message in Texas.
  • HOUSTON sold for $25,000 in January 2013.
  • 3 sold for $20,500 in May 2019.
  • 8 sold for $10,500 in November 2018.
  • ALAMO sold for $10,250 in March 2016.
  • 99 sold for $9,000 in April 2018.
  • 1969 sold for $5,250 in August 2017.

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