Paso Robles Contractor Reports ‘The Top Green Construction Trends for 2021’

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Green construction for both residential and commercial property continues to gain popularity as people become more concerned about energy and water efficiency and reducing the quantities of materials that wind up in landfills. Frank Cueva, the Paso Robles contractor and owner of Central Pacific Construction has recently released a report about green construction trends for 2021.

contractor Paso Robles
Salvaged materials are valued for their workmanship, character and patinas, history and because recycling them keeps them out of the landfills.

Green construction for both residential and commercial property continues to gain popularity as people become more concerned about energy and water efficiency and reducing the quantities of materials that wind up in landfills. Frank Cueva, the Paso Robles contractor and owner of Central Pacific Construction has recently released a report about green construction trends for 2021.

A green home or commercial building is designed to be environmentally sustainable by focusing on the efficient use of resources. Along with more efficient energy and water use, recycled building materials are playing a larger part in the design and construction for home and business.

Water and energy efficient appliances and solar energy remain popular components of green construction. There are more recycled building materials on the market today than in past years as manufacturers do their part to support the environment and respond to market demand.

Along with commercial recycled building materials, which includes flooring and roofing made from recycled materials and recycled metal, tiles and glass, salvaged materials are at the top of the list. Popular salvaged materials include:

  • Old wood
  • Doors and window frames
  • Reclaimed architectural elements
  • Antique and vintage kitchen and bathroom fixtures

Salvaged materials are valued for their workmanship, character and patinas, history and because recycling them keeps them out of the landfills. “But, it’s important to have a conversation with your contractor to be sure the item is structurally valid to be used for the intended purpose,” cautions Cueva, the Paso Robles contractor.

Old wood, for example, may have beautiful grain and a valued weathered character, but it needs to be strong enough for the intended use. Termites and mildewed, rotted sections are going to exclude old wood, no matter how much visual character it might have. The same applies to reclaimed architectural elements such as old pillars or other structures that may have been weight bearing in their younger days. Aging may mean those pieces can now be used ornamentally, but not structurally.

Green construction has been on a steady upswing since the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) established the Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) green building rating system in 1998. Today, the LEED rating system is the most widely used green building rating system in the world all kinds of buildings from residential to agricultural and commercial. In fact, Investor Management Services (IMS) reports that in California, A LEED certified home sells for approximately $17,000 more than a regular home.

Industry forecasts are that the green construction industry is continuing to grow. A report from Emergen Research published in GlobeNewsWire forecasts that the global green construction market will be worth $610 billion by 2027.

Pacific Construction has been serving Paso Robles and surrounding cities since 1997 and has a reputation for has a reputation for bold, stylish designs and is committed to quality work. Services include bathroom remodeling, kitchen remodeling, residential and commercial construction, remodeling and repairs. The company holds an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau and regularly receives rave testimonials from satisfied customers.

Central Pacific Construction
3200 Riverside Ave Ste 120
Paso Robles, CA 93446
(805) 471-4749

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Scott Brennan
Access Publishing
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