Power to Decide Statement On Supreme Court Decision Allowing Employers To Deny Contraceptive Coverage

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Today, in a 7 to 2 decision in Trump v. Pennsylvania, the Supreme Court ruled that regulations allowing employers and universities to opt out of covering birth control in their insurance plans if they cite a religious or moral objection are legal—leaving women covered by those plans to shoulder the full cost of their birth control without any insurance coverage.

"Today’s ruling is a devastating blow to women’s health. The Supreme Court allowing employers to carve out contraception benefits denies women access to the full range of contraceptive methods they need to stay healthy and achieve their goals," - Power to Decide, CEO, Gillian Sealy.

Today, in a 7 to 2 decision in Trump v. Pennsylvania, the Supreme Court ruled that regulations allowing employers and universities to opt out of covering birth control in their insurance plans if they cite a religious or moral objection are legal—leaving women covered by those plans to shoulder the full cost of their birth control without any insurance coverage.

In response, Power to Decide CEO, Gillian Sealy issued the following statement.

“Today’s ruling is a devastating blow to women’s health. The Supreme Court allowing employers to carve out contraception benefits denies women access to the full range of contraceptive methods they need to stay healthy and achieve their goals.

“Contraception is basic health care that almost all women in the U.S. use at some point in their lives. Yet, the ruling allows employers to single it out and make women financially responsible for the cost of this most fundamental part of their reproductive well-being. As a result of today’s ruling, women across the country can no longer have confidence that the insurance plan they pay for will provide them with access to contraceptive care they want, need and is right for them.

“By allowing employers to cherry pick what constitutes appropriate health care options for women, today’s decision removes women as decisionmakers in their own health care. The choice to use contraception and what method to use is a deeply personal one between a health care provider and patient alone—not an employer.

“We must continue to fight against the outdated misconception that bosses should make decisions regarding women’s health care instead of women themselves. We strongly encourage employers to continue providing coverage of the full range of contraceptive methods.”

Please note Power to Decide CEO, Gillian Sealy, is available for interviews and to provide further comments regarding the impact of the case.

Power to Decide is a private, non-partisan, non-profit organization that works to ensure all people—no matter who they are, where they live or what their economic status might be—have the power to decide if, when and under what circumstances to get pregnant and have a child. Please visit us at http://www.PowerToDecide.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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Paloma Zuleta
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