Remembering Navy Memorial Founder Dr. Jack P. London

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Powerful leader, philanthropist, and patriot, Dr. Jack London has passed away after a career of military leadership and service.

“Dr London may no longer be with us, but his legacy of patriotism, his life of service and the example of his character will forever mark his passage. May he rest in peace. Fair winds and following seas, shipmate."

We are heartbroken at the loss of Dr. Jack P. London, one of the United States Navy Memorial’s founding members and an esteemed patriot. “With Dr. Jack London's passing, our country has lost a patriot of the highest order, a man who put his country before himself his entire life. He was our Navy's strongest advocate and the Navy Memorial's most ardent supporter,” said Admiral John C. Harvey, Jr, Chairman of the Board of the US Navy Memorial Foundation. “Dr. London may no longer be with us, but his legacy of patriotism, his life of service and the example of his character will forever mark his passage. May he rest in peace. Fair winds and following seas, shipmate."

Dr. London has been involved with the US Navy Memorial since the 1970s and was one of the leaders that brought the vision to reality. He has been a key member of our Board of Directors, being first elected to the board in 2008. He most recently was a leader in the development of the Strategic Plan and also served as the Chairman of the Nominating Committee, steering the Navy Memorial into a bright future. His overwhelming philanthropic spirit helped build the Navy Memorial Foundation into the effective foundation of naval remembrance that it has become. In 2019, because of his extraordinary accomplishments in business and his dedication to the mission of the US Navy Memorial, the Memorial’s Board of Directors voted unanimously to award Dr. London the Lone Sailor Award.

Dr. London served in the United States Navy, including missions involving in the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Soviet Union’s nuclear submarine threat. He was with the airborne recovery team for Col. John Glenn's Mercury Program space flight in Freedom 7 in the Caribbean on February 20, 1962 on the USS Randolph (CVS-15). Later, at the height of the Vietnam War, he served as Aide and Administrative Assistant to the Vice Chief of the Naval Material Command, Department of the Navy (1969-70).

His excellent service record grew his experience in executive leadership. After retiring from the Navy as a Captain, Dr. London began a career at consulting firm CACI International Inc. He quickly rose through the ranks, creating the modern-day CACI that is known today, becoming Executive Chairman and Chairman of the board. Under his leadership, the organization grew into a fiscal giant, now conducting business all over the world in the modern marketplace.

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Mason Manuel
@NavyMemorial
since: 02/2009
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