ResumeBuilder.com Survey Finds 1 in 4 Employees Admit to Quiet Quitting

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Over 90 percent of quiet quitters say incentives like more money or paid time off would motivate them to work harder

“When employees are disgruntled or dissatisfied, it will most likely affect work performance,” says Stacie Haller. “The trend toward quiet quitting shows that employers need to address the main factors driving low engagement and a lack of initiative among workers.”

ResumeBuilder.com, the premier resource for free and professional resume templates, has published a recent survey report to share insight into increased disengagement and low effort among American workers. The study generated responses from 1,000 adult employees and examines the underlying factors driving this trend.

Research shows that 21 percent of workers are ‘quiet quitting’ by doing the bare minimum, and 5 percent say they are underperforming on the job. Mid-career employees between the ages of 35 and 44 are more likely to be quiet quitters. Twenty-four percent of workers from this group say they do not perform tasks above their job requirement. In comparison, 17 percent of respondents aged 18 to 24, 18 percent of 45- to 54-year-olds, and 7 percent of employees over age 54 say the same.

Survey results also indicate that men are less likely to be overachievers at work. Although men and women are quiet quitting at a similar rate, 7 percent of men admit to doing less than the requirement, compared to 3 percent of women. Additionally, 46 percent of quiet quitters say they do not want to perform tasks above their level of professional responsibility. Respondents also cite mental health and work-life balance as other reasons for doing the bare minimum on the job.

“When employees are disgruntled or dissatisfied, it will most likely affect work performance,” says Stacie Haller, career counselor and executive recruiter. “The trend toward quiet quitting shows that employers need to address the main factors driving low engagement and a lack of initiative among workers.”

According to the report, 91 percent of workers say incentives would motivate them to work harder. Seventy-five percent of respondents would be motivated with more money, 48 percent with more paid time off, and 40 percent with better healthcare.

The majority of underperforming employees also believe that management is aware of their lack of effort. Seventy-three percent of workers from this group say it will be harder to advance, and 65 percent say they are putting themselves at risk of getting fired. Additionally, 97 percent of those who believe they are risking their jobs say being let go would be concerning.

ResumeBuilder.com commissioned and conducted this study via the online platform Pollfish. The survey was distributed on August 17, 2022. All data found within this report derives from the survey, and appropriate respondents were found via Pollfish's screening tools. Respondents were asked to answer all questions truthfully and to the best of their abilities. To view the complete report, please visit https://www.resumebuilder.com/1-in-4-of-workers-quiet-quitting-saying-no-to-hustle-culture/.

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Julia Morrissey
ResumeBuilder.com
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