Salimetrics’ Growing List of Cytokines Which Can Be Reliably Tested in Saliva Now Includes IL-17A, IL-5, and IL-7 for Fast, Easy Salivary Biomarker Analysis

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Salimetrics brings better methods to cytokine research with the addition of 3 new analytes, IL-5, IL-7, and IL-17A, which can now be reliably measured in saliva. These new cytokine tests are available as part of the Salimetrics SalivaLab’s Extended Cytokine Panel. Now, up to 12 prominent cytokines that regulate chronic and acute inflammation can be tested from a single, low-volume saliva sample, making non-invasive saliva sampling a great choice for researchers.

Salivary Cytokines
These new additions will further bridge the multi-disciplinary gap to provide even more objective and comprehensive conclusions to be drawn without any negative impact to the study workflow or participant compliance.

Salimetrics’ original panel of cytokines validated in saliva integrated the four popular cytokines IL-1 Beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-Alpha so that researchers could immediately study inflammation and immune function using non-invasive saliva sampling. These cytokines are closely related in function and more in line with an acute inflammatory response. Subsequently, Salimetrics validated IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-10, IL-12p70, and IL-13, some of which are anti-inflammatory, critical for more chronic conditions of immune pathology or produced in response to ongoing infections.

Now, the newly validated cytokine markers IL-5, IL-7, and IL-17A further expand the list of cytokines that can be accurately tested in saliva. Salivary cytokine testing from the Salimetrics SalivaLab will aid researchers in building a critical foundation of peer-reviewed research and accelerate the evolution of new discoveries. “The biological relationships combined with the continued interest in salivary cytokines by investigators underpins the necessity for assays that work together to expand the cutting edge of salivary cytokine research,” says Supriya Gaitonde, Ph.D., Salimetrics Senior Applications Scientist. “By combining additional cytokines, researchers are now able to obtain a more complete picture with respect to how the body responds to inflammation and immune function.”

“Today, the ideal solution for research critically focused on multiple analytes being assayed from the same sample just got even better,” says Steve Granger, Ph.D., Salimetrics CSO. “These new additions will further bridge the multi-disciplinary gap to provide even more objective and comprehensive conclusions to be drawn without any negative impact to the study workflow or participant compliance.”

Human Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) is an important marker for chronic inflammation. In fact, elevated levels of IL-17A have been associated with many chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), psoriasis, multiple sclerosis (MS), and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). IL-17A is also elevated in fluids from the lungs of patients with asthma and COPD. It comes as no surprise that IL-17A is a popular drug target and drugs (ixekizumab, secukinumab) have been approved by the FDA for psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and are being used as off label therapeutics for treating RA, IBD, and SLE. More specific to the salivary glands, IL-17A is also involved in Sjogren’s syndrome.

Human Interleukin-5 (IL-5) mainly drives the maturation and maintenance of eosinophils and antibody secreting B cells. Dysregulation of IL-5 is associated with eosinophilia, atopic dermatitis, and pulmonary fibrosis. IL-5 is also expressed in the mast cells of asthmatic airways and is a promising drug target for the treatment of asthma. In fact, three therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mepolizumab, benralizumab and reslizumab) have received FDA approval targeting IL-5 to treat severe eosinophilic asthma. Measuring IL-5, in combination with IL-13 and TNF, in oral fluid is of interest for asthma researchers since fluids from the lung exchange with saliva and levels are elevated in asthmatic patients.

Human Interleukin-7 (IL-7) activity is important for every stage of T cell development, survival of naïve T cells, and generation and maintenance of CD4 and CD8 memory. Pathologies associated with IL-7 are those mediated by dysregulation of lymphoid function such as autoimmune diseases (diabetes and multiple sclerosis) and chronic inflammatory diseases (rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease). IL-7 signaling is also associated with lymphoid leukemias.

The Salimetrics Cytokine Panel will continue to feature the core-4 cytokines (IL-1 Beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-Alpha), but now includes the ability to add-on up to 8 additional cytokines, including salivary; IFN-Gamma, IL-2, IL-5, IL-7, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, and IL-17A. This means that researchers can now measure up to 12 cytokines from one saliva sample at Salimetrics’ SalivaLab, which makes Salimetrics’ panel the most robust salivary cytokine panel available. This expansion reinforces Salimetrics’ commitment to further revolutionize salivary cytokine testing and provide researchers access to validated methodologies that deliver precise and reproducible results.

“We're happy to offer this expanded service to the family of Salivary Bioscience researchers,” says Dr. Granger, “It shows that we are actively committed to providing the best and most accurate salivary bioscience methods to researchers around the world – and we make it as easy as picking up the phone or sending an e-mail.”

About Salimetrics
Salimetrics’ assay kits and CLIA-certified testing services are used to measure salivary analytes related to stress, behavior and development, inflammation, sleep, reproduction, health and immune function. Founded in 1998 by Douglas A. Granger, Ph.D., Salimetrics, LLC supports CROs, pharmaceuticals, academic researchers and the immunodiagnostic industry around the world with innovative immunoassay products, non-invasive saliva collection methods, and laboratory testing services.

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