Seven years after his death, Baquet Estate announces images captured by the late Photographer Harold Baquet are now available to the public

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Focused with his lens on everyday life in the Crescent City, though with an emphasis on the Creole and African-American neighborhoods he grew up in, Mr. Baquet acquired a massive collection of slides, negatives, prints and other items which are now housed at the Historic New Orleans Collection (HNOC).

One of the few news and documentary photographers of New Orleans whose archives were not destroyed by the floodwaters following the levee failures that covered New Orleans in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina, Harold Baquet captured in film a community that in many ways is simply not there anymore.

Focused with his lens on everyday life in the Crescent City, though with an emphasis on the Creole and African-American neighborhoods he grew up in, Mr. Baquet acquired a massive collection of slides, negatives, prints, and other items which are now housed at the Historic New Orleans Collection (HNOC).

In cooperation with HNOC, these images are now available to the public for purchase online at Fine Art America.

His widow Cheron Brylski said only a limited number of images are currently posted for sale, but more will be added in the future.

“The beauty of this site is that individuals can buy a rare, signed historical print at reasonable prices, frame it themselves, and have it shipped to them already matted or printed on canvas, or they can even make their own t-shirts,” said Ms. Brylski. “Images can also be purchased for limited use by news organizations.”

Each print carries with it a signature from the artist.

Mr. Baquet, a seventh-generation Creole New Orleanian, died seven years ago after a lengthy battle with cancer. He worked both as a news photographer, the photographer for five New Orleans mayors – including the first Black mayor of New Orleans, the late Ernest N. Morial – as well as the photographer for Loyola University New Orleans.

His work was donated to the Historic New Orleans Collection because at the time it lacked significant documentation of African-American life in the city captured by a Black artist. Since his estate’s donation, HNOC has increased its focus on documenting the Creole and Black culture of New Orleans, according to Ms. Brylski.

The direct link to Mr. Baquet’s site is https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/haroldbaquetphotography. When an image is clicked, the purchase options available become visible.

Proceeds from sales will go to expanding the site. For more information, contact cbrylski@aol.com or call (504) 460-1468.

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Cheron Brylski
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