SIUE’s Luo Hosts Successful International Conference Online

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International attendees exchanged scientific developments and discoveries during the successful online Conference Series on Nonlinear Dynamics and Complexity, founded and hosted by Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Engineering’s Albert Luo, PhD, distinguished research professor in the Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering.

SIUE’s Albert Luo, PhD, distinguished research professor in the Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering.

"The online format saved people both time and cost, while still achieving our goals of research communication and international networking."

International attendees exchanged scientific developments and discoveries during the successful online Conference Series on Nonlinear Dynamics and Complexity, founded and hosted by Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Engineering’s Albert Luo, PhD, distinguished research professor in the Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering.

Held in late November, the virtual conference series presented an opportunity for acclaimed researchers like Luo to present on fundamental and frontier theories and techniques for modern science and technology, stimulate research interest, and share new knowledge with the next generation of researchers, engineers and technologists.

The conference featured six plenary talks, five award presentations, 15 invited talks and 91 presentations from 31 countries, including Russia, China, Germany, Spain, Italy, Portugal, Greece, Poland, Brazil, Mexico, Canada and more. Topics included mathematical modeling of nonlinear dynamical systems, disease pandemic modeling and predictions, fractional dynamics, data science and artificial intelligence, and artificial systems.

According to Luo, among the positives of the online format was attendees’ ability to access presentations as convenient in various time zones.

“The conference organization committee shared the videos on YouTube, which accommodated the time zones of local symposium organizers,” Luo explained. “Participants liked the conference style, as they could efficiently discuss problems to resolve their puzzles in research. The online format saved people both time and cost, while still achieving our goals of research communication and international networking. Two groups of scientists from Portugal and Greece have since indicated their interest in organizing the next conference on Nonlinear Dynamics and Complexity.”

Luo presented on his pioneering research, “Bifurcation trees of periodic motions to chaos in nonlinear mechanical systems.”

“This research has provided a way to determine periodic motions to chaos in mechanical systems,” Luo explained. “One can better understand the dynamical behaviors of mechanical systems. Further, one can use and control the mechanical systems well to serve society. Such breakthrough will change traditional thinking in nonlinear mechanical systems.”

“If the similar method is applied in disease pandemic modeling, one may accurately know the development of disease pandemic evolutions,” he added. “Such new results will help smart city and artificial intelligence to develop more efficient algorithms.”

Awards were granted to five scientists for their contributions in nonlinear science complexity:

  • Lagrange Award: Vladimir Nekorkin, of Russia, for his lifetime achievements in nonlinear dynamics and bifurcation theory. Nekorkin presented “Dynamics of oscillatory adaptive networks.”
  • G.M. Zaslavsky Award: Dimitri Volchenkov, of the United States, for development of a non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory approach to stochastic nonlinear dynamics. Volchenkov presented “How Structure Creates Force.”
  • V. Afraimovich Award: Vitali Vougalter, of Canada, for his exceptional achievements in the Theory of non-Fredholm integro-differential equations. He presented “Solvability of some Integro-differential Equations with Concentrated Sources.”
  • C.S. Hsu Award: Miguel A. F. Sanjuán, of Spain, for his outstanding achievements in Chaos Theory, which opens new perspectives on predictability in Nonlinear Dynamics and Complexity. He presented “Binary Black Hole Shadows: Chaos in General Relativity.”
  • C.S. Hsu Award: C. Steve Suh, of the United States, for his incredible advancements in Nonlinear time-frequency control and application of ultrafast techniques to advanced manufacturing. He presented “On Time-frequency Control of Nonlinear Systems.”

For more information on the conference, visit ndc.lhscientificpublishing.com.

The SIUE School of Engineering is one of the largest engineering schools in the region. It offers comprehensive and affordable engineering programs with eight undergraduate degrees, five master’s degrees and two cooperative doctoral programs. Students learn from expert faculty, perform cutting-edge research, and participate in intercollegiate design competitions. Companies in the metropolitan St. Louis area provide students challenging internships and co-op opportunities, which often turn into permanent employment. Students gain hands-on experience in the School’s state-of-the-art facilities, including the new Fowler Student Design Center.

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